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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 568 pages of information about Young Folks Treasury, Volume 2 (of 12).

“A great freedom of treatment was necessary but it will be observed by every one who attempts to render these legends malleable in his intellectual furnace, that they are marvelously independent of all temporary modes and circumstances.  They remain essentially the same, after changes that would affect the identity of almost anything else.”

Now to those who have not jumped over my head, or to those who, having done so, may jump back to this foreword, I trust my few remarks will have given some additional interest in our myths and heroes of lands far and near.

DANIEL EDWIN WHEELER

MYTHS OF MANY COUNTRIES

MYTHS OF GREECE AND ROME

BAUCIS AND PHILEMON

ADAPTED BY C.E.  SMITH

One evening, in times long ago, old Philemon and his wife Baucis sat at their cottage door watching the sunset.  They had eaten their supper and were enjoying a quiet talk about their garden, and their cow, and the fruit trees on which the pears and apples were beginning to ripen.  But their talk was very much disturbed by rude shouts and laughter from the village children, and by the fierce barking of dogs.

“I fear,” said Philemon, “that some poor traveler is asking for a bed in the village, and that these rough people have set the dogs on him.”

“Well, I never,” answered old Baucis.  “I do wish the neighbors would be kinder to poor wanderers; I feel that some terrible punishment will happen to this village if the people are so wicked as to make fun of those who are tired and hungry.  As for you and me, so long as we have a crust of bread, let us always be willing to give half of it to any poor homeless stranger who may come along.”

“Indeed, that we will,” said Philemon.

These old folks, you must know, were very poor, and had to work hard for a living.  They seldom had anything to eat except bread and milk, and vegetables, with sometimes a little honey from their beehives, or a few ripe pears and apples from their little garden.  But they were two of the kindest old people in the world, and would have gone without their dinner any day, rather than refuse a slice of bread or a cupful of milk to the weary traveler who might stop at the door.

Their cottage stood on a little hill a short way from the village, which lay in a valley; such a pretty valley, shaped like a cup, with plenty of green fields and gardens, and fruit trees; it was a pleasure just to look at it.  But the people who lived in this lovely place were selfish and hard-hearted; they had no pity for the poor, and were unkind to those who had no home, and they only laughed when Philemon said it was right to be gentle to people who were sad and friendless.

These wicked villagers taught their children to be as bad as themselves.  They used to clap their hands and make fun of poor travelers who were tramping wearily from one village to another, and they even taught the dogs to snarl and bark at strangers if their clothes were shabby.  So the village was known far and near as an unfriendly place, where neither help nor pity was to be found.

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