Young Folks Treasury, Volume 2 (of 12) eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 568 pages of information about Young Folks Treasury, Volume 2 (of 12).

There was a certain hill which men called Janiculum on the side of the river, and this hill King Porsenna took by a sudden attack.  Which when Horatius saw (for he chanced to have been set to guard the bridge, and saw also how the enemy were running at full speed to the place, and how the Romans were fleeing in confusion and threw away their arms as they ran), he cried with a loud voice, “Men of Rome, it is to no purpose that ye thus leave your post and flee, for if ye leave this bridge behind you for men to pass over, ye shall soon find that ye have more enemies in your city than in Janiculum.  Do ye therefore break it down with axe and fire as best ye can.  In the meanwhile I, so far as one man may do, will stay the enemy.”  And as he spake he ran forward to the farther end of the bridge and made ready to keep the way against the enemy.  Nevertheless there stood two with him, Lartius and Herminius by name, men of noble birth both of them and of great renown in arms.  So these three for a while stayed the first onset of the enemy; and the men of Rome meanwhile brake down the bridge.  And when there was but a small part remaining, and they that brake it down called to the three that they should come back, Horatius bade Lartius and Herminius return, but he himself remained on the farther side, turning his eyes full of wrath in threatening fashion on the princes of the Etrurians, and crying, “Dare ye now to fight with me? or why are ye thus come at the bidding of your master, King Porsenna, to rob others of the freedom that ye care not to have for yourselves?” For a while they delayed, looking each man to his neighbor, who should first deal with this champion of the Romans.  Then, for very shame, they all ran forward, and raising a great shout, threw their javelins at him.  These all he took upon his shield, nor stood the less firmly in his place on the bridge, from which when they would have thrust him by force, of a sudden the men of Rome raised a great shout, for the bridge was now altogether broken down, and fell with a great crash into the river.  And as the enemy stayed a while for fear, Horatius turned him to the river and said, “O Father Tiber, I beseech thee this day with all reverence that thou kindly receive this soldier and his arms.”  And as he spake he leapt with all his arms into the river and swam across to his own people, and though many javelins of the enemy fell about him, he was not one whit hurt.  Nor did such valor fail to receive due honor from the city.  For the citizens set up a statue of Horatius in the market-place; and they gave him of the public land so much as he could plow about in one day.  Also there was this honor paid him, that each citizen took somewhat of his own store and gave it to him, for food was scarce in the city by reason of the siege.

HOW CINCINNATUS SAVED ROME

ADAPTED BY ALFRED J. CHURCH

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Young Folks Treasury, Volume 2 (of 12) from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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