The Fugitive Blacksmith eBook

James W.C. Pennington
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 75 pages of information about The Fugitive Blacksmith.

CHAPTER V.

SEVEN MONTHS’ RESIDENCE IN THE FAMILY OF J.K.  A MEMBER OF THE SOCIETY OF FRIENDS, IN CHESTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.—­REMOVAL TO NEW YORK—­BECOMES A CONVERT TO RELIGION—­BECOMES A TEACHER.

On leaving W.W., I wended my way in deep sorrow and melancholy, onward towards Philadelphia, and after travelling two days and a night, I found shelter and employ in the family of J.K., another member of the Society of Friends, a farmer.

The religious atmosphere in this family was excellent.  Mrs. K. gave me the first copy of the Holy Scriptures I ever possessed, she also gave me much excellent counsel.  She was a preacher in the Society of Friends; this occasioned her with her husband to be much of their time from home.  This left the charge of the farm upon me, and besides put it out of their power to render me that aid in my studies which my former friend had.  I, however, kept myself closely concealed, by confining myself to the limits of the farm, and using all my leisure time in study.  This place was more secluded, and I felt less of dread and fear of discovery than I had before, and although seriously embarrassed for want of an instructor, I realized some pleasure and profit in my studies.  I often employed myself in drawing rude maps of the solar system, and diagrams illustrating the theory of solar eclipses.  I felt also a fondness for reading the Bible, and committing chapters, and verses of hymns to memory.  Often on the Sabbath when alone in the barn, I would break the monotony of the hours by endeavouring to speak, as if I was addressing an audience.  My mind was constantly struggling for thoughts, and I was still more grieved and alarmed at its barrenness; I found it gradually freed from the darkness entailed by slavery, but I was deeply and anxiously concerned how I should fill it with useful knowledge.  I had a few books, and no tutor.

In this way I spent seven months with J.K., and should have continued longer, agreeably to his urgent solicitation, but I felt that life was fast wearing, and that as I was now free, I must adventure in search of knowledge.  On leaving J.K., he kindly gave me the following certificate,—­

  “East Nautmeal, Chester County, Pennsylvania, Tenth Month 5th, 1828.

“I hereby certify, that the bearer, J.W.C.  Pennington, has been in my employ seven months, during most of which time I have been from home, leaving my entire business in his trust, and that he has proved a highly trustworthy and industrious young man.  He leaves with the sincere regret of myself and family; but as he feels it to be his duty to go where he can obtain education, so as to fit him to be more useful, I cordially commend him to the warm sympathy of the friends of humanity wherever a wise providence may appoint him a home.

  Signed,

  “J.K.”

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The Fugitive Blacksmith from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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