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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 176 pages of information about Elements of Civil Government.

CHAPTER XVII.

Law and liberty.

Origin; Kinds of Law; Courts; Suits; Judges; Grand Jury; Trial Jury;
Origin of Juries; Officers of Courts; Legal Proceedings; Suggestive
Questions

CHAPTER XVIII.

Suffrage and elections.

Suffrage; Importance; Elections; Methods of Voting; Officers of
Elections; Bribery; Suggestive Questions

CHAPTER XIX.

The Australian ballot system,

Origin; In the United States; Principles; Requirements; Voting;
Advantages; Forms of Ballots; In Louisville; In Massachusetts; In
Indiana; Suggestive Questions

CHAPTER XX.

Parties and party machinery.

Origin; Necessity; Party Machinery; Committees; Conventions; Calling
Conventions; Local and State Conventions; National Convention;
Platform; Nominations; Primary Elections; Caucuses; Suggestive Questions

CHAPTER XXI.

Legislation.

Bills; Introduction; Committees; Reports; Amendments; Passage;
Suggestive Questions

CHAPTER XXII.

Revenue and taxation.

Revenue; Taxation; Necessity of Taxation; Direct Taxes; Indirect Taxes;
Customs or Duties; Internal Revenue; Suggestive Questions

CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES

INDEX

ELEMENTS OF CIVIL GOVERNMENT

PART I.

CHAPTER I.

THE FAMILY.

Introductory.[1]—­People living in the United States owe respect and obedience to not less than four different governments; that is, to four forms of organized authority.  They have duties, as citizens of a township or civil district, as citizens of a county, as citizens of some one of the States, and as citizens of the United States.  All persons are, or have been, members of a family; some also live under a village or city government; and most children are subject to the government, of some school.  Many people in this country live under six governments—­namely, the family, the township or civil district, the village or city, the county, the State, and the United States; while children who live in villages or cities, and attend school, are subject to seven different governments.  These organizations are so closely related that the duties of the people as citizens of one do not conflict with their duties as citizens of the others.  The better citizen a person is of one of these governments the better citizen he is of all governments under which he lives.

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