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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 102 pages of information about The Red Record.
At the outskirts of the crowd I was attacked again, and then several men, no doubt glad to get away from the fearful place, escorted me to my home, where I was allowed to take a small amount of clothing.  A jeering crowd gathered without, and when I appeared at the door ready hands seized me and I was placed upon a rail, and, with curses and oaths, taken to the railway station and placed upon a train.  As the train moved out some one thrust a roll of bills into my hand and said, “God bless you, but it was no use.”

When asked if he should ever return to Paris, Mr. King said:  “I shall never go south again.  The impressions of that awful day will stay with me forever.”

LYNCHING OF INNOCENT MEN

(Lynched on Account of Relationship)

If no other reason appealed to the sober sense of the American people to check the growth of Lynch Law, the absolute unreliability and recklessness of the mob in inflicting punishment for crimes done, should do so.  Several instances of this spirit have occurred in the year past.  In Louisiana, near New Orleans, in July, 1893, Roselius Julian, a colored man, shot and killed a white judge, named Victor Estopinal.  The cause of the shooting has never been definitely ascertained.  It is claimed that the Negro resented an insult to his wife, and the killing of the white man was an act of a Negro (who dared) to defend his home.  The judge was killed in the court house, and Julian, heavily armed, made his escape to the swamps near the city.  He has never been apprehended, nor has any information ever been gleaned as to his whereabouts.  A mob determined to secure the fugitive murderer and burn him alive.  The swamps were hunted through and through in vain, when, being unable to wreak their revenge upon the murderer, the mob turned its attention to his unfortunate relatives.  Dispatches from New Orleans, dated September 19, 1893, described the affair as follows: 

Posses were immediately organized and the surrounding country was scoured, but the search was fruitless so far as the real criminal was concerned.  The mother, three brothers and two sisters of the Negro were arrested yesterday at the Black Ridge in the rear of the city by the police and taken to the little jail on Judge Estopinal’s place about Southport, because of the belief that they were succoring the fugitive.
About 11 o’clock twenty-five men, some armed with rifles and shotguns, came up to the jail.  They unlocked the door and held a conference among themselves as to what they should do.  Some were in favor of hanging the five, while others insisted that only two of the brothers should be strung up.  This was finally agreed to, and the two doomed negroes were hurried to a pasture one hundred yards distant, and there asked to take their last chance of saving their lives by making a confession, but the Negroes made no reply.  They were then told to
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