Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, October 16, 1841 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 58 pages of information about Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, October 16, 1841.

DEAR SIR,—­The enthusiastic delight myself (an humble individual) and the immense body of your enraptured constituents felt upon reading your truly patriotic, statesman-like, learned, straightforward and consistent speech, may be conceived by a person of your immense parliamentary imagination, but cannot be expressed by my circumscribed vocabulary.  In stating that my trifling exertions for the return of such a patriot are more than doubly recompensed by your noble conduct, may I be allowed to suggest the earnest wish of my eldest son to be in town, for the pleasure of being near such a representative, which alone induces him to accept the situation of landing-waiter you so kindly insisted upon his preparing for.  You will, I am sure, be happy to learn, the last baby, as you desired is christened after:—­“the country’s, the people’s, nay, the world’s member!”

Believe me, with united regards from Mrs. F. and Joseph, ever your staunch supporter and admirer,

FUNK FLAT.

To Gripe Gammon, Esq., M.P.

(Fourthly.)

ANSWER TO THE SAME, FROM GRIPE GAMMON, M.P.

St. Stephen’s.

DEAR AND KIND CONSTITUENT,—­I am more than happy.  My return for your borough has satisfied you, my country, and myself!  What can I say more?  Pray give both my names to the dear innocent.  Be careful in the spelling, two “M’s” in Gammon, one following the A, the other preceding the O, and immediately next to the final N. I think I have now answered every point of your really Junisean letter.  Let me hear from you soon—­you cannot TOO SOON—­and believe me,

My dear Funk, yours ever,

GRIPE GAMMON.

Funk Flat, Esq., &c. &c.

(Fifthly.)

FROM THE SAME TO THE SAME. (SECOND LETTER).

Bumbleton Butts, April 4, 1841.

MY DEAR FRIEND AND PATRON,—­All’s right, the two M’s are in their places, when will Joe be in his? I know your heart; pray excuse my earnestness, but oblige me with an early answer.  Joe is dying to be near so kind, so dear, so sincere a friend.

More devotedly than ever yours,

FUNK FLAT

G. Gammon, Esq., M.P., &c. &c.

(Sixthly.)

ANSWER FROM THE M.P.  TO THE ABOVE.

St. Stephen’s.

How can I express my feelings? My name, mine engrafted on the innocent offspring of the thoroughbred Funks, evermore to be by them and their heirs handed down to posterity!  How I rejoice at that circumstance, and the intelligence I have so happily received about the wretched situation you speak of.  Fancy, Funk, fancy the man, your son, in a moment of rashness, I meant to succeed, died of a sore-throat! an infallible disorder attendant upon the duties of those d—­d landing-waiterships.  What an escape we have had!  The place is given to my butler, so there’s no fear.  Kiss the child, and believe me ever,

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Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, October 16, 1841 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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