Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 306 pages of information about Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know.

“Do it again, papa.  Do it again!  It’s such fun!  Dear, funny papa!”

And if he tried to catch her, she glided from him in an instant, not in the least afraid of him, but thinking it part of the game not to be caught.  With one push of her foot, she would be floating in the air above his head; or she would go dancing backwards and forwards and sideways, like a great butterfly.  It happened several times, when her father and mother were holding a consultation about her in private, that they were interrupted by vainly repressed outbursts of laughter over their heads; and looking up with indignation, saw her floating at full length in the air above them, whence she regarded them with the most comical appreciation of the position.

One day an awkward accident happened.  The princess had come out upon the lawn with one of her attendants, who held her by the hand.  Spying her father at the other side of the lawn, she snatched her hand from the maid’s, and sped across to him.  Now when she wanted to run alone, her custom was to catch up a stone in each hand, so that she might come down again after a bound.  Whatever she wore as part of her attire had no effect in this way.  Even gold, when it thus became as it were a part of herself, lost all its weight for the time.  But whatever she only held in her hands retained its downward tendency.  On this occasion she could see nothing to catch up but a huge toad, that was walking across the lawn as if he had a hundred years to do it in.  Not knowing what disgust meant, for this was one of her peculiarities, she snatched up the toad and bounded away.  She had almost reached her father, and he was holding out his arms to receive her, and take from her lips the kiss which hovered on them like a butterfly on a rosebud, when a puff of wind blew her aside into the arms of a young page, who had just been receiving a message from his Majesty.  Now it was no great peculiarity in the princess that, once she was set agoing, it always cost her time and trouble to check herself.  On this occasion there was no time.  She must kiss—­and she kissed the page.  She did not mind it much; for she had no shyness in her composition; and she knew, besides, that she could not help it.  So she only laughed, like a musical box.  The poor page fared the worst.  For the princess, trying to correct the unfortunate tendency of the kiss, put out her hands to keep off the page; so that, along with the kiss, he received, on the other cheek, a slap with the huge black toad, which she poked right into his eye.  He tried to laugh, too, but the attempt resulted in such an odd contortion of countenance, as showed that there was no danger of his pluming himself on the kiss.  As for the king, his dignity was greatly hurt, and he did not speak to the page for a whole month.

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Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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