Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 306 pages of information about Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know.
he had tasted any food.  The wolf then shut the door, and laid himself down in the bed, and waited for Little Red Riding Hood, who very soon after reached the house.  Tap! tap!  “Who is there?” cried he.  She was at first a little afraid at hearing the gruff voice of the wolf, but she thought that perhaps her grandmother had got a cold, so she answered:  “It is your grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood.  Mamma has sent you some cheesecakes, and a little pot of butter.”  The wolf cried out in a softer voice, “Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up.”  Little Red Riding Hood pulled the bobbin, and the door went open.  When she came into the room, the wolf hid himself under the bedclothes, and said to her, trying all he could to speak in a feeble voice:  “Put the basket on the stool, my dear, and take off your clothes, and come into bed.”  Little Red Riding Hood, who always used to do as she was told, straight undressed herself, and stepped into bed; but she thought it strange to see how her grandmother looked in her nightclothes, so she said to her:  “Dear me, grandmamma, what great arms you have got!” “They are so much the better to hug you, my child,” replied the wolf.  “But grandmamma,” said the little girl, “what great ears you have got!” “They are so much the better to hear you, my child,” replied the wolf.  “But then, grandmamma, what great eyes you have got!” said the little girl.  “They are so much the better to see you, my child,” replied the wolf.  “And grandmamma, what great teeth you have got!” said the little girl, who now began to be rather afraid.  “They are to eat you up,” said the wolf; and saying these words, the wicked creature fell upon Little Red Riding Hood, and ate her up in a moment.

CHAPTER XX

THE THREE BEARS

In a far-off country there was once a little girl who was called Silver-hair, because her curly hair shone brightly.  She was a sad romp, and so restless that she could not be kept quiet at home, but must needs run out and away, without leave.

One day she started off into a wood to gather wild flowers, and into the fields to chase butterflies.  She ran here and she ran there, and went so far, at last, that she found herself in a lonely place, where she saw a snug little house, in which three bears lived; but they were not then at home.

The door was ajar, and Silver-hair pushed it open and found the place to be quite empty, so she made up her mind to go in boldly, and look all about the place, little thinking what sort of people lived there.

Now the three bears had gone out to walk a little before this.  They were the Big Bear, and the Middle-sized Bear, and the Little Bear; but they had left their porridge on the table to cool.  So when Silver-hair came into the kitchen, she saw the three bowls of porridge.  She tasted the largest bowl, which belonged to the Big Bear, and found it too cold; then she tasted the middle-sized bowl, which belonged to the Middle-sized Bear, and found it too hot; then she tasted the smallest bowl, which belonged to the Little Bear, and it was just right, and she ate it all.

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Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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