Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 306 pages of information about Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know.
The castle vanished away like smoke and the head of the giant Galligantus was sent to King Arthur.  The knights and ladies rested that night at the old man’s hermitage, and next day they set out for the court.  Jack then went up to the king, and gave his majesty an account of all his fierce battles.  Jack’s fame had spread through the whole country; and at the king’s desire, the duke gave him his daughter in marriage, to the joy of all the kingdom.  After this the king gave him a large estate; on which he and his lady lived the rest of their days, in joy and content.

CHAPTER XIX

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD

Once upon a time there lived in a village a country girl, who was the sweetest little creature that ever was seen; her mother naturally loved her with excessive fondness, and her grandmother doted on her still more.  The good woman had made for her a pretty little red-coloured hood, which so much became the little girl, that every one called her Little Red Riding Hood.

One day her mother having made some cheesecakes, said to her, “Go, my child, and see how your grandmother does, for I hear she is ill; carry her some of these cakes, and a little pot of butter.”  Little Red Riding Hood straight set out with a basket filled with the cakes and the pot of butter, for her grandmother’s house, which was in a village a little way off the town that her mother lived in.  As she was crossing a wood, which lay in her road, she met a large wolf, which had a great mind to eat her up, but dared not, for fear of some wood-cutters, who were at work near them in the forest.  Yet he spoke to her, and asked her whither she was going.  The little girl, who did not know the danger of talking to a wolf, replied:  “I am going to see my grandmamma, and carry these cakes and a pot of butter.”  “Does she live far off?” said the wolf.  “Oh yes!” answered Little Red Riding Hood; “beyond the mill you see yonder, at the first house in the village.”  “Well,” said the wolf, “I will take this way, and you take that, and see which will be there the soonest.”

The wolf set out full speed, running as fast as he could, and taking the nearest way, while the little girl took the longest; and as she went along began to gather nuts, run after butterflies, and make nose-gays of such flowers as she found within her reach.  The wolf got to the dwelling of the grandmother first, and knocked at the door.  “Who is there?” said some voice in the house.  “It is your grandchild, Little Red Riding Hood,” said the wolf, speaking like the little girl as well as he could.  “I have brought you some cheesecakes, and a little pot of butter, that mamma has sent you.”  The good old woman, who was ill in bed, called out, “Pull the bobbin, and the latch will go up.”  The wolf pulled the bobbin, and the door went open.  The wolf then jumped upon the poor old grandmother, and ate her up in a moment, for it was three days since

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Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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