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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 245 pages of information about Narrative of Services in the Liberation of Chili, Peru and Brazil,.
“Desirous to expedite, without loss of time, the gift of 4000 quadras of land, which, by decree of the Senate, was assigned to the Commander-in-Chief of the Squadron, Vice-Admiral Lord Cochrane, as a demonstration of public appreciation for his distinguished services in the ‘Restoration,’ of the important fortress of Valdivia; the said 4000 quadras are assigned on the lands of Rio Clara, in the province of Conception, being part of the confiscated estate of Pablo Furtado, a fugitive Spaniard.”
“’The present deed shall serve as a sufficient title to the property in favour of the Vice-Admiral, being communicated to the Minister of Finance, in order to the accustomed formalities, to receive possession and enjoy the benefits.’”

  “I have the honour to communicate the above, by Supreme orders, for your
   information.”

  “God preserve your Excellency many years.”

  “(Signed) JOSE IGNACIO ZENTENO. 
   Administration of Marine,
   Valparaiso, August SO, 1820. 
   Published by order of His Excellency.”

* * * * *

CHAPTER IV.

OBSTACLES TO EQUIPPING THE SQUADRON—­SAILING OF THE LIBERATING EXPEDITION—­DEBARCATION AT PISCO—­LONG INACTION OF THE ARMY—­GENERAL SAN MARTIN REMOVES TO ANCON—­CAPTURE OF THE ESMERALDA—­EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS—­ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF THE SERVICE BY GENERAL SAN MARTIN—­LADY COCHRANE’S VISIT TO MENDOZA.

The difficulties which attended the equipment of the squadron and troops destined for the liberation of Peru were very great, the Government being without credit, whilst its treasury had been completely exhausted by efforts to organise an army—­a loan being impossible, and indeed refused.  By my influence with the British merchants, I managed to obtain considerable quantities of naval and military stores, and in addition, a contribution to a subscription which was set on foot, in place of a forced loan, upon which the Government hesitated to venture.

The greatest difficulty was, however, with regard to the foreign seamen, who, disgusted with the want of faith towards them, refused to re-enter the service.  The Government, upon this, requested me to resort to impressment, which I declined, telling them, moreover, that the captain of the British frigate then in port would not permit his countrymen to be impressed.  The alternative proposed was to use my influence with the men, by issuing such a proclamation, dictated by myself, as would render them dependent for their pay and prize-money upon General San Martin, and on the success of the expedition; it being evident that they would not place further confidence in the promises of the Government.

A joint proclamation was therefore issued by Gen. San Martin and myself, my signature being added as a guarantee, whilst his bore the authority of Commander-in-Chief.  The following extract will shew the nature of this proclamation:—­

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