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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 245 pages of information about Narrative of Services in the Liberation of Chili, Peru and Brazil,.
me thereto annexed, which were preferred by Don Jose de San Martin to the Chilian Government relative to my conduct in Peru, in order that a record may remain whereby to judge of facts when the actors shall have passed from this scene.  Then the even hand of time shall poise the scale of justice, apportioning to all the due measure of approbation or reproach.

   That the acts of the Sovereign Congress and of the Executive
   Government of Peru may be such as shall call forth the admiration
   and secure the affections of its people, is the prayer of

   Your Excellency’s obedient humble Servant,
   COCHRANE. 
   Valparaiso, Dec. 12, 1822.

One word more with regard to these accusations of San Martin.  It was not till all his offers to me to abandon my allegiance to Chili, and to join him in his defection had proved unavailing, that he sought to revenge himself by such charges, well knowing that Zenteno and his party in the Chilian ministry would second any chance of injuring me in public estimation from their unabating personal enmity to me, arising from my constant opposition to their selfish measures for private advantage.  Into these matters I have no inclination to enter, though possessing abundant materials for disclosing a career of state dishonesty without parallel in the history of Governments.

Up to the time of my last refusal of San Martin’s offers, made through Monteagudo, everything was “couleur de rose”—­with all kinds of declarations that “my lot should be equal to his own”—­though, thank God, my lot has been of a far different nature.  It was within a week of my last refusal that his charges against me were trumped up.  I will select one more from his numerous letters now in my possession, to show that nothing but revenge at being disappointed in my co-operation to ensure his personal aggrandisement, could have influenced him to perpetrate such an act of meanness.

   Lima, 20 Aug., 1821.

   My esteemed friend,

Your appreciated letter, received yesterday, has convinced me that the frankness of your sentiments is only equalled by the regard you entertain for the public cause—­especially as to matters under my charge.  I cannot view the counsel and opinions you offer, otherwise than as proof of the zeal you entertain for my interests.  Aware of the estimation in which you hold glorious acts, I cannot do otherwise than sympathize with you, as you desire that I shall augment those I have acquired.  Without entertaining a doubt that I shall contribute effectually in the field still open to us—­more particularly to you, I wish that the enterprises in which you evince so much zeal, did not require so great temerity to carry them out, and such enthusiasm to bring them to a successful result. Believe me, my Lord, that nothing will make me swerve from the determination that the lot of Lord Cochrane shall be that of Gen. San Martin.
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