McGuffey's Fourth Eclectic Reader eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 252 pages of information about McGuffey's Fourth Eclectic Reader.

Incorrect Correct Incorrect Correct

Hoce        hosts     sec’s       sects
tes         tests     bus         busts
lifs        lifts     cense       cents
tuffs       tufts     ob-jec’s    ob-jects
ac’s        acts      re-spec’s   re-spects

W for Wh

Incorrect Correct Incorrect Correct

Wale Whale Wet Whet
Weal Wheel Wine Whine
Wen When Wip Whip

SENTENCES FOR PRACTICE

Sentences like the following may be read with great advantage, for the purpose of acquiring distinctness and precision in articulation.

This act, more than all other acts, laid the ax at the root of the evil.  It is false to say he had no other faults.

The hosts still stand in strangest plight.  That last still night.  That lasts till night.  On either side an ocean exists.  On neither side a notion exists.  Among the rugged rocks the restless ranger ran.  I said pop-u-lar, not pop’lar.  I said pre-vail, not pr’vail.  I said be-hold, not b’hold.

Think’st thou so meanly of my Phocion?  Henceforth look to your hearths.  Canst thou minister to a mind diseased?  A thousand shrieks for hopeless mercy call.

ACCENT.

Accent, marked thus (’), is an increased force of voice upon some one syllable of a word; as, Col’o-ny, bot’a-ny; re-mem’ber, im-por’tant; rec-ol-lect’, rep-re-sent’.  In the words col’o-ny and bot’a-ny, the first syllable is accented.  In the words re-mem’ber and im-por’tant, the second syllable is accented.  In the words rec-ol-lect’ and rep-re-sent’, the third syllable is accented.

INFLECTION.

Inflection is an upward or downward slide of the voice.  The Rising Inflection, sometimes marked thus (’), is an upward slide of the voice.

Examples

Has he come’? 
Has he gone? 
Are you sick’? 
Will you go’? 
Are they here’?

The Falling Inflection, marked thus (’) is a downward slide of the voice.

Examples

They are here. 
He has gone. 
He has come
I will go. 
I am well.

Let the pupil practice these examples until he is perfectly familiar with the rising and falling inflections.

Are you sick or well?  Will you go, or stay? 
Did he ride, or walk?  Is it black, or white? 
Is he rich, or poor?  Are they old, or young? 
Did you say cap, or cat?  I said cat, not cap. 
Did you say am, or ham?  I said ham, not am.

Is the dog white’, or black’?  The dog is black’, not white’. 
Did you say and’, or hand’?  I said and’, not hand’. 
Is the tree large’, or small’?  The tree is small’, not large’. 
Are the apples sweet’, or sour’?  The apples are sour’ not sweet’. 
Is the tide high’, or low’?  The tide is high’, not low’. 
Did you say play’, or pray’?  I said pray’, not play’.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
McGuffey's Fourth Eclectic Reader from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.