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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 285 pages of information about The White Wolf and Other Fireside Tales.

His design was to leave the ship as he found it, carrying away only these tokens that his story, when he arrived at Brattahlid, might be received with faith; and to direct where the ship might be sought for.  But as he quitted the cabin some of his men shouted from the deck, where they had discovered yet another body frozen in a drift.  This was an old man seated with crossed legs and leaning against the mast, having an ink-horn slung about his neck, and almost hidden by his grey beard, and on his knee a book, which he held with a thumb frozen between two pages.

This was the book which Snorri had brought to Brattahlid, and which the Bishop of Garda read aloud to him that same afternoon, translating as he went; the ink being fresh, the writing clerkly, and scarcely a page damaged by the weather.  It bore no title; but the Bishop, who afterwards caused his secretary to take a copy of the tale, gave it a very long one, beginning:  “God’s mercy shown in a Miracle upon certain castaways from Jutland, at the Feast of the Nativity of His Blessed Son, our Lord, in the year MCCCLVII., whereby He made dead trees to put forth in leaf, and comforted desperate men with summer in the midst of the Frozen Sea” . . . with much beside.  But all this appears in the tale, which I will head only with the name of the writer.

II.—­PETER KURT’S MANUSCRIPT [1]

Now that our troubles are over, and I sit by the mast of our late unhappy ship, not knowing if I am on earth or in paradise, but full-fed and warm in all my limbs, yea pierced and glowing with the love of Almighty God, I am resolved to take pen and use my unfrozen ink in telling out of what misery His hand hath led us to this present Eden.

I who write this am Peter Kurt, and I was the steward of my master Ebbe while he dwelt in his own castle of Nebbegaard.  Poor he was then, and poor, I suppose, he is still in all but love and the favour of God; but in those days the love was but an old servant’s (to wit, my own), and the favour of God not evident, but the poverty, on the other hand, bitterly apparent in all our housekeeping.  We lived alone, with a handful of servants—­sometimes as few as three—­in the castle which stands between the sandhills and the woods, as you sail into Veile Fiord.  All these woods, as far away as to Rosenvold, had been the good knight his father’s, but were lost to us before Ebbe’s birth, and leased on pledge to the Knight Borre, of Egeskov, of whom I am to tell; and with them went all the crew of verderers, huntsmen, grooms, prickers, and ostringers that had kept Nebbegaard cheerful the year round.  His mother had died at my master’s birth, and the knight himself but two years after, so that the lad grew up in his poverty with no heritage but a few barren acres of sand, a tumbling house, and his father’s sword, and small prospect of winning the broad lands out of Borre’s clutches.

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