An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800 eBook

Mary Frances Cusack
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 779 pages of information about An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800.

[Illustration:  ANCIENT DRINKING VESSEL OR METHER, FROM THE COLLECTION OF THE R.I.A.]

[Illustration:  TABLE AND CHAIR USED AT THE CONFEDERATION OF KILKENNY.]

FOOTNOTES: 

[462] Fortunes.—­Smith’s History of Kerry, vol. ii. p. 97.

[463] Papists.—­Oliver’s Collections, quoted by Dr. Moran, p. 250.

[464] World.—­Dr. Rothe, quoted by Monsignor Moran, p. 251.

[465] Writing.—­The original is in the Cot.  Col.  British Museum.

[466] Tully Castle.—­See heading of this chapter.

[467] Adultery.—­MS. History, by Rev. A. Stuart, quoted in Reid’s History of the Presbyterian Church, vol. i. p. 96.

[468] Lectured.  The address of the Irish party to James is given in O’Sullivan Beare’s History, p. 316, and also the King’s reply, p. 323.  A collection made throughout Ireland to defray the expenses of the delegates.

[469] Puritan—­Plowden’s History of Ireland, vol. i. p. 338.  “By his management and contrivance, he provided the whole doctrine of Calvin to be received as the public belief of the Protestant Church of Ireland, and ratified by Chichester in the King’s name.”  Chichester himself was a thorough Puritan, and a disciple of Cartwright, who used to pray, “O Lord, give us grace and power as one man to set ourselves against them” (the bishops).

[470] Franciscan.—­An account of the sufferings of the Franciscans will be found in St. Francis and the Franciscans.  The Poor Clares, who are the Second Order of St. Francis, were refounded and established in Ireland, by Sir John Dillon’s sister, about this time, and suffered severe persecutions.  Miss Dillon, the Abbess, was brought before the Lord Deputy; but her quiet dignity made such impression on the court, that she was dismissed without molestation for the time.

[471] From me.—­Stafford’s State Letters, vol. i. p. 331.

[472] Sovereign.—­Strafford’s Letters, vol. ii. p. 241.

[473] Means.—­This curious document was first published in the Nation of February 5th, 1859.

CHAPTER XXIX.

English Adventurers speculate on Irish Disaffection—­Coote’s Cruelties—­Meeting of Irish Noblemen and Gentlemen—­Discontent of the People—­The Catholic Priests try to save Protestants from their fury—­A National Synod to deliberate on the State of Irish Affairs—­The General Assembly is convened at Kilkenny—­A Mint is established—­A Printing-Press set up—­Relations are entered into with Foreign States, and a Method of Government is organized—­Differences of Opinion between the Old Irish and Anglo-Irish—­A Year’s Treaty is made—­Arrival of Rinuccini—­He lands at Kenmare—­His Account of the Irish People—­His Reception at Kilkenny—­His Opinion of the State of Affairs—­Divisions of the Confederates—­Ormonde’s Intrigues—­The Battle of Benburb—­Divisions and Discord in Camp and Senate—­A Treaty signed and published by the Representatives of the English King—­Rinuccini returns to Italy.

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An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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