The Children's Hour, Volume 3 (of 10) eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 471 pages of information about The Children's Hour, Volume 3 (of 10).

“And to tell you the truth, my precious little folks,” quoth King Midas, diligently trotting the children all the while, “ever since that morning, I have hated the very sight of all other gold, save this!”

THE POMEGRANATE SEEDS

By Nathaniel Hawthorne

Mother Ceres was exceedingly fond of her daughter Proserpina, and seldom let her go alone into the fields.  But, just at the time when my story begins, the good lady was very busy, because she had the care of the wheat, and the Indian corn, and the rye and barley, and, in short, of the crops of every kind, all over the earth; and as the season had thus far been uncommonly backward, it was necessary to make the harvest ripen more speedily than usual.  So she put on her turban, made of poppies (a kind of flower which she was always noted for wearing), and got into her car drawn by a pair of winged dragons, and was just ready to set off.

“Dear mother,” said Proserpina, “I shall be very lonely while you are away.  May I not run down to the shore, and ask some of the sea-nymphs to come up out of the waves and play with me?”

“Yes, child,” answered Mother Ceres.  “The sea-nymphs are good creatures, and will never lead you into any harm.  But you must take care not to stray away from them, nor go wandering about the fields by yourself.  Young girls, without their mothers to take care of them, are very apt to get into mischief.”

The child promised to be as prudent as if she were a grown-up woman, and, by the time the winged dragons had whirled the car out of sight, she was already on the shore, calling to the sea-nymphs to come and play with her.  They knew Proserpina’s voice, and were not long in showing their glistening faces and sea-green hair above the water, at the bottom of which was their home.  They brought along with them a great many beautiful shells; and, sitting down on the moist sand, where the surf wave broke over them, they busied themselves in making a necklace, which they hung round Proserpina’s neck.  By way of showing her gratitude, the child besought them to go with her a little way into the fields, so that they might gather abundance of flowers, with which she would make each of her kind playmates a wreath.

“Oh, no, dear Proserpina,” cried the sea-nymphs; “we dare not go with you upon the dry land.  We are apt to grow faint, unless at every breath we can snuff up the salt breeze of the ocean.  And don’t you see how careful we are to let the surf wave break over us every moment or two, so as to keep ourselves comfortably moist?  If it were not for that, we should soon look like bunches of uprooted sea-weed dried in the sun.”

“It is a great pity,” said Proserpina, “but do you wait for me here, and I will run and gather my apron full of flowers, and be back again before the surf wave has broken ten times over you.  I long to make you some wreaths that shall be as lovely as this necklace of many-colored shells.”

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The Children's Hour, Volume 3 (of 10) from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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