The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson; and the Younger Eddas of Snorre Sturleson eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 255 pages of information about The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson; and the Younger Eddas of Snorre Sturleson.

Gripir.

51.  Then will Gudrun be furious at heart, when her brothers shall on thy death resolve.  In nothing then will that wise woman take delight.  Such is Grimhild’s work.

52.  In this thou shalt find comfort, leader of hosts!  This fortune is allotted to the hero’s life:  a more renowned man on earth shall never be, under the sun’s abode, than thou wilt be accounted.

Sigurd.

53.  Now part we, now farewell!  Fate may not be withstood.  Now hast thou, Gripir! done as I prayed thee:  thou wouldst have fain a happier end foretold me of my life’s days, hadst thou been able.

THE SECOND LAY OF SIGURD FAFNICIDE.

Sigurd went to Hialprek’s stud and chose himself a horse, which was afterwards named Grani.  Regin, Hreidmar’s son, was then come to Hialprek; he was the most skilful of men, and a dwarf in stature; he was wise, cruel, and versed in magic.  Regin undertook the rearing and instruction of Sigurd, and bore him great affection.  He informed Sigurd of his parentage, and how it befell that Odin, and Hoenir, and Loki came to Andvarafors (the waterfall of Andvari).  In the fall there was an abundance of fish.  There was a dwarf named Andvari, who had long lived in the fall in the likeness of a pike, and in which he supplied himself with food.  “Our brother,” continued Regin, “was named Otr, who often went into the fall in the likeness of an otter.  He had caught a salmon, and was sitting on the bank of the river with his eyes shut eating it, when Loki killed him with a stone.  The AEsir thought themselves very lucky, and stripped off the otter’s skin.  That same evening they sought entertainment with Hreidmar, and showed their prize.  Thereupon we laid hands on them, and imposed on them, as the redemption of their lives, that they should fill the otter’s skin with gold, and cover it over with red gold.  They thereupon sent Loki to procure gold.  He went to Ran, and obtained her net, and thence proceeded to Andvarafors, and cast the net before a pike, which leapt into the net.  Whereupon Loki said: 

1.  What fish is this, that in the river swims, and cannot from harm itself protect?  Redeem thy life from Hel, and find me the water’s flame.[59] The Pike.

2.  Andvari I am named, Oin was my father named; many a cataract have I passed.  A luckless Norn in times of old decreed, that in the water I should wade.

Loki.

3.  Tell me, Andvari! if thou wilt enjoy life in the halls of men, what retribution get the sons of mortals, if with foul words they assail each other.

Andvari.

4.  Cruel retribution get the sons of mortals, who in Vadgelmir wade:  for the false words they have against others uttered, the punishments too long endure.

Loki viewed all the gold that Andvari owned; but when he had produced the gold, he retained a single ring, which Loki also took from him.  The dwarf went into his stone and said: 

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The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson; and the Younger Eddas of Snorre Sturleson from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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