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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 255 pages of information about The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson; and the Younger Eddas of Snorre Sturleson.

Harbard.

46.  So speak I of such a subject.

Thor.

47.  Thy shrewd words will bring thee evil, if I resolve the sound to ford.  Louder than a wolf thou wilt howl, I trow, if of my hammer thou gettest a touch.

Harbard.

48.  Sif has a gallant at home; thou wilt anxious be to find him:  thou shalt that arduous work perform; it will beseem thee better.

Thor.

49.  Thou utterest what comes upmost, so that to me it be most annoying, thou dastardly varlet!  I believe thou art lying.

Harbard.

50.  I believe I am telling truth.  Thou art travelling slowly; thou wouldst have long since arrived, hadst thou assumed another form.

Thor.

51.  Harbard! thou wretch! rather is it thou who hast detained me.

Harbard.

52.  I never thought that a ferryman could the course of Asa-Thor retard.

Thor.

53.  One advice I now will give thee:  row hither with thy boat; let us cease from threats; approach the sire of Magni.

Harbard.

54.  Go farther from the sound, the passage is refused thee.

Thor.

55.  Show me then the way, if thou wilt not ferry me across the water.

Harbard.

56.  That’s too little to refuse.  ’Tis far to go; ’tis to the stock an hour, and to the stone another; then keep the left hand way, until thou reachest Verland; there will Fiorgyn find her son Thor, and point out to him his kinsmen’s ways to Odin’s land.

Thor.

57.  Can I get there to-day?

Harbard.

58.  With pain and toil thou mayest get there, while the sun is up, which, I believe, is now nigh.

Thor.

59.  Our talk shall now be short, as thou answerest with scoffing only.  For refusing to ferry me I will reward thee, if another time we meet.

Harbard.

60.  Just go to where all the powers of evil may have thee.

FOOTNOTES: 

[Footnote 36:  Giantesses, witches, etc.]

THE JOURNEY OR LAY OF SKIRNIR.

Frey, son of Niord; had one day seated himself in Hlidskialf, and was looking over all regions, when turning his eyes to Jotunheim, he there saw a beautiful girl, as she was passing from her father’s dwelling to her bower.  Thereupon he became greatly troubled in mind.  Frey’s attendant was named Skirnir; him Niord desired to speak with Frey; when Skadi said:—­

1.  Rise up now, Skirnir! go and request our son to speak; and inquire with whom he so sage may be offended.

Skirnir.

2.  Harsh words I have from your son to fear, if I go to speak with him, and to inquire with whom he so sage may be offended.

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