Vandover and the Brute eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 299 pages of information about Vandover and the Brute.

By and by she drew a long sigh, her face became the face of an imbecile, stupid, without expression, her eyes half-closed, her mouth half-open.  Her head rolled forward as though she were nodding in her sleep, while a long drip of saliva trailed from her lower lip.  Vandover’s father bent over her quickly, crying out sharply, “Hallie!—­what is it?” All at once the train for which they were waiting charged into the depot, filling the place with a hideous clangor and with the smell of steam and of hot oil.

This scene of her death was the only thing that Vandover could remember of his mother.

As he looked back over his life he could recall nothing after this for nearly five years.  Even after that lapse of time the only scene he could picture with any degree of clearness was one of the greatest triviality in which he saw himself, a rank thirteen-year-old boy, sitting on a bit of carpet in the back yard of the San Francisco house playing with his guinea-pigs.

In order to get at his life during his teens, Vandover would have been obliged to collect these scattered memory pictures as best he could, rearrange them in some more orderly sequence, piece out what he could imperfectly recall and fill in the many gaps by mere guesswork and conjecture.

It was the summer of 1880 that they had come to San Francisco.  Once settled there, Vandover’s father began to build small residence houses and cheap flats which he rented at various prices, the cheapest at ten dollars, the more expensive at thirty-five and forty.  He had closed out his business in the East, coming out to California on account of his wife’s ill health.  He had made his money in Boston and had intended to retire.

But he soon found that he could not do this.  At this time he was an old man, nearly sixty.  He had given his entire life to his business to the exclusion of everything else, and now when his fortune had been made and when he could afford to enjoy it, discovered that he had lost the capacity for enjoying anything but the business itself.  Nothing else could interest him.  He was not what would be called in America a rich man, but he had made money enough to travel, to allow himself any reasonable relaxation, to cultivate a taste for art, music, literature or the drama, to indulge in any harmless fad, such as collecting etchings, china or bric-a-brac, or even to permit himself the luxury of horses.  In the place of all these he found himself, at nearly sixty years of age, forced again into the sordid round of business as the only escape from the mortal ennui and weariness of the spirit that preyed upon him during every leisure hour of the day.

Early and late he went about the city, personally superintending the building of his little houses and cheap flats, sitting on saw-horses and piles of lumber, watching the carpenters at work.  In the evening he came home to a late supper, completely fagged, bringing with him the smell of mortar and of pine shavings.

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Vandover and the Brute from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.