The Religion of the Ancient Celts eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 382 pages of information about The Religion of the Ancient Celts.
with Mars—­Camulos, known also on the Continent and perhaps the same as Cumal, father of Fionn; Belatucadros, “comely in slaughter”; Cocidius, Corotiacus, Barrex, and Totatis (perhaps Lucan’s Teutates).  Others are equated with Apollo in his character as a god of healing—­Anextiomarus, Grannos (at Musselburgh and in many continental inscriptions), Arvalus, Mogons, etc.  Most of these and many others found on isolated inscriptions were probably local in character, though some, occurring also on the Continent, had attained a wider popularity.[452] But some of the inscriptions referring to the latter may be due to Gaulish soldiers quartered in Britain.

COMPARATIVE TABLE OF DIVINITIES WITH SIMILAR NAMES IN IRELAND, BRITAIN, AND GAUL.

Italics denote names found in Inscriptions.

IRELAND.  BRITAIN.  GAUL.
              Anextiomarus Anextiomarus
Anu Anna (?) Anoniredi, “chariot of Anu”
Badb Bodua
              Beli, Belinus Belenos
              Belisama Belisama
Brigit Brigantia Brigindu
Bron Bran Brennus (?)
Buanann Buanu
Cumal Camulos Camulos
Danu Don
              Epona Epona
Goibniu Govannon
              Grannos Grannos
Ler Llyr
Lug Llew or Lleu (?) Lugus, Lugores
              Mabon, Maponos Maponos
Manannan Manawyddan
              Matres Matres
Mider Medros (?)
              Modron Matrona (?)
Nemon Nemetona
Net Neton
Nuada Nodons, Nudd
              Hael, Lludd (?)
Ogma Ogmios
              Silvanus Silvanus
              Taran Taranis
              Totatis, Tutatis Teutates

FOOTNOTES: 

[328] The text of the Mabinogion has been edited by Rh[^y]s and Evans, 1887, and it has been translated into English by Lady Guest, and more critically, into French, by Loth.  Many of the Triads will be found in Loth’s second volume.  For the poetry see Skene, Four Ancient Books of Wales.

[329] These incidents are found mainly in the story of Branwen, e.g. those of the cauldron, a frequent accessory in Irish tales; the regeneration of the warriors, also found in the story of Mag-tured, though no cauldron is used; the red-hot house, occurring also in Mesca Ulad; the description of Bran paralleled by that of MacCecht.

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The Religion of the Ancient Celts from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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