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Nehemiah Adams
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 243 pages of information about The Sable Cloud.

But I must close my long letter.  When you write again, I have no doubt that you will have seen some things in a new light.  Tell me more about your studies.  I was interested in your way of describing things.  I only wondered that, with your occasional sense of the ludicrous, you should not have been aware of the impression which you yourself must have made on others.  Burns’s “giftie,” “to see oursel’s,” etc., we all, more or less, need.  I told Hattie the other day that I thought some parts of your letter did you very great credit, but that the monomania of the North has fallen upon you, and that you have it, as it seemed to me, in one of its worst forms.  Some it makes fierce, others, flat, according as the victim is, naturally, more or less amiable.

Your mother gave you in charge to me in her last sickness, and I must do all in my power for your best good.  I have, therefore, told you some things which I have seen and considered.  These you must now add to the facts of your “inductive philosophy.”  Your definition of “pro-slavery,” and “friends of oppression,” is a fair illustration of a prevailing state of mind at the North:—­“Pro-slavery—­i.e., do not agree with me in my manner of viewing and treating the subject.”  This you will correct.  Excuse my freedom, but you have no father nor mother now, to advise and guide you, and you must let me be your Mentor in some things.  I shall keep your letter and let you see it perhaps ten years hence.  Be careful what newspapers you read.  Those which abound with low, opprobrious language about the South and Southerners, avoid.  There are some low Southerners about here who go around buying up refractory and vicious negroes; they are the dregs of society; but I have listened, with others, at the North, to men, on the subject of “freedom,” who, I think, would take kindly to this business, and they would be as hearty in it as they are now in vilifying it.  The “Legrees” are not confined to the South.  Do not incline your ear to those who systematically inveigh against slavery, making it their principal business.  You will invariably find that there is something false and wrong in their principles as well as spirit.  Be careful to what influences you commit your thoughts and your taste.

You need not become a friend of oppression; you need not approve of “auction-blocks,” and “separation of families;” slavery can exist when these are done away.  Until you are appointed and commissioned as a minister of righteousness to Southern Christians and ministers, I advise you to blot slavery out of the list of topics about which you are called to express the least concern.  The South will work out the problem for herself, with the help of that God who has evidently appointed her to do a great work for the African race, and all the more perfectly and speedily as our Northern people let her entirely alone as to the moral relations of the subject.

You subscribe yourself, “Yours for the slave;” I shall subscribe myself, “Yours for preaching the Gospel to every creature.”

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