A New Hochelagan Burying-ground Discovered at Westmount on the Western Spur of Mount Royal, Montreal, July-September, 1898 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 17 pages of information about A New Hochelagan Burying-ground Discovered at Westmount on the Western Spur of Mount Royal, Montreal, July-September, 1898.

No.  III.—­The Tallest Man

This skeleton is also that of a large powerfully built man, even taller man the last.  The skull is larger, though not quite so massive.  It is longer and narrower and dolicephalus, the occipital region very prominent.  The height index is low (70.5).

The face is broad as compared with the length 124-112 and the cheek bones are prominent, lower jaw is heavy and strong.

The bones of this skeleton are well preserved and it is almost entire, there being only a few of the bones of the hands and feet missing.  The pelvis is masculine.  The bones are long, large and heavy with marked impressions and processes.

The femur measures 17-7/8 inches so that this man must have been six feet or more and of muscular frame.

Among the bones of No III skeleton were 2 small rib bones of a bird.

Judging from the general conformation of the three skulls, it would appear that No.  I, was that of the most intelligent person of the three and No.  III of the least No.  II being intermediate.

It is difficult to estimate the height of No.  I as the femur is so decayed at both ends, but allowing for this, the height would not be more than 5 feet and probably less than that.  The skeletons undoubtedly belong to the Mongoloid type and are distinctive of the North American Indians.

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A New Hochelagan Burying-ground Discovered at Westmount on the Western Spur of Mount Royal, Montreal, July-September, 1898 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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