Baltimore Catechism No. 4 (of 4) eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 424 pages of information about Baltimore Catechism No. 4 (of 4).

Rev. Thomas L. Kinkead
June 21, 1891,
Feast of St. Aloysius

An
Explanation
Of The
Baltimore Catechism
of Christian Doctrine

Basic Catholic Prayers

THE LORD’S PRAYER

Our Father, Who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy name.  Thy kingdom come.  Thy will be done on earth as it is in Heaven.  Give us this day our daily bread.  And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.  And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.  Amen.

This is the most beautiful and best of all prayers, because Our Lord Himself made it. (Matt. 6:9; Luke 11:2).  One day when He was praying and explaining to His Apostles the great advantages of prayer, one of them said to Him:  “Lord, teach us to pray.”  Then Jesus taught them this prayer.  It contains everything we need or could ask for.  We cannot see its full meaning at once.  The more we think over it, the more clearly we understand it.  We could write whole pages on almost every word, and still not say all that could be said about this prayer.  It is called “the Lord’s,” because He made it, and sometimes the “Our Father,” from the first words.

We say “Our,” to show that we are all brethren, and that God is the Father of us all, and therefore we pray not for ourselves alone but for all God’s children.

We say “Father,” because God really is our Father.  We do not mean here by Father the First Person of the Blessed Trinity, but the Blessed Trinity itself—­one God.  What does a father do for his children?  He gives them their natural existence, provides them with food and clothing, teaches, protects, and loves them, shares with them all that he has, and when he dies leaves them his possessions.  Now, in all these ways, and in a much truer sense, God is our Father.  He created us and gives us all that is necessary to sustain life.  He gives light, heat, and air, without any one of which we could not live.  He provides for us also food and clothing, and long before we need or even think of these things God is thinking of them.  Did you ever reflect upon just how much time and trouble it costs to produce for you even one potato, of which you think so little?  About two years before you need that potato, God puts it into the mind of the farmer to save the seed that he may plant it the following year.  In the proper season he prepares the ground with great care and plants the seed.  Then God sends His sunlight and rain to make it grow, but the farmer’s work is not yet ended:  he must continue to keep the soil in good condition and clear away the weeds.  In due time the potato is taken from the ground, brought to the market, carried to your house, cooked and placed before you.  You take it without even thinking, perhaps, of all this trouble, or thanking God for His goodness.  This is only one article of food, and the same may be said of all the rest.  Your clothing is provided for

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Baltimore Catechism No. 4 (of 4) from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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