Baltimore Catechism No. 3 (of 4) eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 220 pages of information about Baltimore Catechism No. 3 (of 4).

Q. 951.  How do we show that the ceremonies of the Church are reasonable and proper?  A. We show that the ceremonies of the Church are reasonable and proper from the fact that all persons in authority, rulers, judges and masters, require certain acts of respect from their subjects, and as we know Our Lord is present on the altar, the Church requires definite acts of reverence and respect at the services held in His honor and in His presence.

Q. 952.  Are there other reasons for the use of ceremonies?  A. There are other reasons for the use of ceremonies:  (1) God commanded ceremonies to be used in the old law, and (2) Our Blessed Lord Himself made use of ceremonies in performing some of His miracles.

Q. 953.  How are the persons who take part in a Solemn Mass or Vespers named?  A. The persons who take part in a Solemn Mass or Vespers are named as follows:  The priest who says or celebrates the Mass is called the celebrant; those who assist him as deacon and sub-deacon are called the ministers; those who serve are called acolytes, and the one who directs the ceremonies is called the master of ceremonies.  If the celebrant be a bishop, the Mass or Vespers is called Pontifical Mass or Pontifical Vespers.

Q. 954.  What is Vespers?  A. Vespers is a portion of the divine office or daily prayer of the Church.  It is sung in Churches generally on Sunday afternoon or evening, and is usually followed by Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament.

Q. 955.  Can one satisfy for neglecting Mass on Sunday by hearing Vespers on the same day?  A. One cannot satisfy for neglecting Mass on Sunday by hearing Vespers on the same day, because there is no law of the Church obliging us under pain of sin to attend Vespers, while there is a law obliging us under pain of mortal sin to hear Mass.

LESSON TWENTY-FIFTH.  ON EXTREME UNCTION AND HOLY ORDERS.

Q. 956. {271} What is the Sacrament of Extreme Unction?  A. Extreme Unction is the Sacrament which, through the anointing and prayer of the priest, gives health and strength to the soul, and sometimes to the body, when we are in danger of death from sickness.

Q. 957.  Why is this Sacrament called Extreme Unction?  A. Extreme means last, and Unction means an anointing or rubbing with oil, and because Catholics are anointed with oil at Baptism, Confirmation and Holy Orders, the last Sacrament in, which oil is used is called Extreme Unction, or the last Unction or anointing.

Q. 958.  Is this Sacrament called Extreme Unction if the person recovers after receiving it?  A. This Sacrament is always called Extreme Unction, even if it must be given several times to the same person, for Extreme Unction is the proper name of the Sacrament, and it may be given as often as a person recovering from one attack of sickness is in danger of death by another.  In a lingering illness it may be repeated after a month or six weeks, if the person slightly recovers and again relapses into a dangerous condition.

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Baltimore Catechism No. 3 (of 4) from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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