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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 220 pages of information about Baltimore Catechism No. 3 (of 4).

LESSON TWENTY-FOURTH.  ON THE SACRIFICE OF THE MASS.

Q. 916. {262} When and where are the bread and wine changed into the body and blood of Christ?  A. The bread and wine are changed into the body and blood of Christ at the Consecration in the Mass.

Q. 917. {263} What is the Mass? 
A. The Mass is the unbloody sacrifice of the body and blood of Christ.

Q. 918.  Why is this Sacrifice called the Mass? 
A. This Sacrifice is called the “Mass” very probably from the words “Ite
Missa est,” used by the priest as he tells the people to depart when the
Holy Sacrifice is ended.

Q. 919. {264} What is a sacrifice?  A. A sacrifice is the offering of an object by a priest to God alone, and the consuming of it to acknowledge that He is the Creator and Lord of all things.

Q. 920. {265} Is the Mass the same sacrifice as that of the Cross? 
A. The Mass is the same sacrifice as that of the Cross.

Q. 921. {266} How is the Mass the same sacrifice as that of the Cross?  A. The Mass is the same sacrifice as that of the Cross because the offering and the priest are the same—­Christ our Blessed Lord; and the ends for which the sacrifice of the Mass is offered are the same as those of the sacrifice of the Cross.

Q. 922. {267} What were the ends for which the sacrifice of the Cross was offered?  A. The ends for which the sacrifice of the Cross was offered were:  1st, To honor and glorify God; 2nd, To thank Him for all the graces bestowed on the whole world; 3rd, To satisfy God’s justice for the sins of men; 4th, To obtain all graces and blessings.

Q. 923.  How are the fruits of the Mass distributed?  A. The fruits of the Mass are distributed thus:  The first benefit is bestowed on the priest who says the Mass; the second on the person for whom the Mass is said, or for the intention for which it is said; the third on those who are present at the Mass, and particularly on those who serve it, and the fourth on all the faithful who are in communion with the Church.

Q. 924.  Are all Masses of equal value in themselves or do they differ in worth?  A. All Masses are equal in value in themselves and do not differ in worth, but only in the solemnity with which they are celebrated or in the end for which they are offered.

Q. 925.  How are Masses distinguished?  A. Masses are distinguished thus:  (1) When the Mass is sung by a bishop, assisted by a deacon and sub-deacon, it is called a Pontifical Mass; (2) When it is sung by a priest, assisted by a deacon and sub-deacon, it is called a Solemn Mass; (3) When sung by a priest without deacon and sub-deacon, it is called a Missa Cantata or High Mass; (4) When the Mass is only read in a low tone it is called a low or private Mass.

Q. 926.  For what end or intention may Mass be offered?  A. Mass may be offered for any end or intention that tends to the honor and glory of God, to the good of the Church or the welfare of man; but never for any object that is bad in itself, or in its aims; neither can it be offered publicly for persons who are not members of the true Church.

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