Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 18 pages of information about False Friends, and The Sailor's Resolve.

Her son was slowly but surely recovering, and his preservation from meeting sudden death unprepared was to her a source of unutterable thankfulness.  Her own family appeared to regard her with even more tender affection than if no coldness had ever arisen between them; and their love was to her beyond price.  Even Sir Gilbert’s harsh, worldly character, was somewhat softened by trials, and by the unmerited kindness which he met with from those whom, in his prosperity, he had slighted and shunned.  Lady Grange felt that her prayers had been answered indeed, though in a way very different from what she had hoped or expected.  The chain by which her son had been gradually drawn down towards rum, by those who sought his company for the sake of his money, had been suddenly snapped by the loss of his fortune.  The weak youth was left to the guidance of those to whom his welfare was really dear.  Philip, obliged to rouse himself from his indolence, and exert himself to earn his living, became a far wiser and more estimable man than he would ever have been as the heir to a fortune; and he never forgot the lesson which pain, weakness, and shame had taught him,—­that the way of evil is also the way of sorrow. Thorns and snares are in the way of the froward.

    Who Wisdom’s path forsakes,
      Leaves all true joy behind: 
    He who the peace of others breaks,
      No peace himself shall find. 
    Flowers above and thorns below,
    Little pleasure, lasting woe,—­
    Such is the fate that sinners know!

    The drunkard gaily sings
      Above his foaming glass;
    But shame and pain the revel brings,
      Ere many hours can pass. 
    Flowers above and thorns below,
    Little pleasure, lasting woe,—­
    Such is the fate that sinners know!

    The thief may count his gains;—­
      If he the sum could see
    Of future punishment and pains,
      Sad would his reckoning be! 
    Flowers above and thorns below,
    Little pleasure, lasting woe,—­
    Such is the fate that sinners know!

    The Sabbath-breaker spurns
      What Wisdom did ordain: 
    God’s rest to Satan’s use he turns,—­
      A blessing to a bane. 
    Flowers above and thorns below,
    Little pleasure, lasting woe,—­
    Such is the fate which sinners know!

    O Lord, to thee we pray;
      Do thou our faith increase;
    Help us to walk in Wisdom’s way,—­
      The only way of peace: 
    For flowers above and thorns below,
    Little pleasure, lasting woe,—­
    Such is the fate which sinners know!

THE SAILOR’S RESOLVE.

     “An angry man stirreth up strife, and a furious man aboundeth in
     transgression.”—­PROV. xxix. 22.

The old sailor Jonas sat before the fire with his pipe in his mouth, looking steadfastly into the glowing coals.  Not that, following a favourite practice of his little niece, he was making out red-hot castles and flaming buildings in the grate, or that his thoughts were in any way connected with the embers:  he was doing what it would be well if we all sometimes did,—­looking into himself, and reflecting on what had happened in relation to his own conduct.

Follow Us on Facebook