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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 281 pages of information about Handbook of Home Rule.

“On the whole, then, it appears that, whatever changes or calamities the future may have in store, the maintenance of the Union is at this day the one sound policy for England to pursue.  It is sound because it is expedient; it is sound because it is just."[57]

I shall not discuss the question of Home Rule with the eminent writers whose works I have cited.  It is enough that they demonstrate the failure of the Union.  So convinced was Mr. Lecky, in 1871, of its failure, that he suggested a readjustment of the relations of the two countries on a federal basis;[58] and Mr. Goldwin Smith, in 1868, contended that the Irish difficulty could only be settled by the establishment of Provincial Councils, and an occasional session of the Imperial Parliament in Dublin.  Mr. Dicey clings to the existing Union while demonstrating its failure, because he has persuaded himself that the only alternative is separation.

Irishmen may be pardoned for acting on Mr. Dicey’s facts, and disregarding his prophecies.  The mass of Irishmen believe, with Grattan, that the ocean protests against separation as the sea protests against such a union as was attempted in 1800.[59]

FOOTNOTES: 

[Footnote 26:  Omissions here and elsewhere are merely for purposes of space.  In some places the omitted parts would strengthen the Irish case; in no place would they weaken it.]

[Footnote 27:  Lecky, Leaders of Public Opinion in Ireland, new edit. (1871), Introduction, pp. viii., xiv.]

[Footnote 28:  Lecky, Leaders of Public Opinion in Ireland, new edit. (1871), Introduction, pp. xiv., xv.]

[Footnote 29:  Lecky, History of England in the Eighteenth Century, vol. ii. pp. 59, 60.]

[Footnote 30:  Leaders of Public Opinion, pp. 33, 34.]

[Footnote 31:  Leaders of Public Opinion, pp. 120-123.]

[Footnote 32:  Leaders of Public Opinion, pp. 125, 126.]

[Footnote 33:  Leaders of Public Opinion, pp. 34-37.]

[Footnote 34:  Leaders of Public Opinion, pp. 134-137.]

[Footnote 35:  Leaders of Public Opinion, pp. 192-195.]

[Footnote 36:  Leaders of Public Opinion, pp. 195, 196.]

[Footnote 37:  Goldwin Smith, Three English Statesmen, p. 274.]

[Footnote 38:  Irish History and Irish Character, pp. 13, 14.]

[Footnote 39:  Ibid., p. 194.]

[Footnote 40:  Ibid., p. 142.]

[Footnote 41:  Irish History and Irish Character, p. 101.]

[Footnote 42:  Irish History and Irish Character, pp. 139, 140.]

[Footnote 43:  Sir George Cornewall Lewis, Irish Disturbances, p. 97.]

[Footnote 44:  Irish History and Irish Character, pp. 153-157.]

[Footnote 45:  Ibid., pp. 70, 71]

[Footnote 46:  The Irish Question, Preface, pp. iii., iv.]

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