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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 281 pages of information about Handbook of Home Rule.

PREFACE.  BY THE RIGHT HON.  EARL SPENCER, K.G.

American home rule
By E.L.  Godkin

How we became home rulers
By James Bryce, M.P.

Home rule and imperial unity
By lord THRING

The Irish government bill and the Irish land bill
By lord THRING

TheUnionistPosition
By Canon Maccoll

A lawyer’s objections to home rule
By E.L.  Godkin

TheUnionistCase for home rule
By R. Barry O’BRIEN

Ireland’s alternatives
By lord THRING

The past and future of the Irish question
By James Bryce, M.P.

Some arguments considered.
By the right HonJohn Morley, M.P.

Lessons of Irish history in the eighteenth century
By the right Hon.  W.E.  Gladstone, M.P.

PREFACE.

The present seems an excellent moment for bringing forward the arguments in favour of a new policy for Ireland, which are to be found in the articles contained in this volume.

We are realizing the first results of the verdict given at the election of 1886.  And this I interpret as saying that the constituencies were not then ready to depart from the lines of policy which, up to last year, nearly all politicians of both parties in Parliament had laid down for their guidance in Irish affairs.

We have had the Session occupied almost wholly with Lord Salisbury’s proposals for strengthening the power of the central Government to maintain law and order in Ireland, and for dealing with the most pressing necessities of the Land question in that country.

It is well, before the policy of the Government is practically tested, that the views of thoughtful men holding different opinions should be clearly set forth, not in the shape of polemical speeches, but in measured articles which specially appeal to those who have not hitherto joined the fighting ranks of either side, and who are sure to intervene with great force at the next election, when the Irish question is again submitted to the constituencies.

I feel that I can add little or nothing to the weight of the arguments contained in these papers, but I should like to give some reasons why I earnestly hope that they will receive careful consideration.

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