Montcalm and Wolfe eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 771 pages of information about Montcalm and Wolfe.

Having stated, as above, that Murray marched out of Quebec with at least 1,714 effective troops, Garneau, not very consistently, goes on to say that he advanced against Levis with six thousand or seven thousand men, and he adds that the two armies were about equal, because Levis had left some detachments behind to guard his boats and artillery.  The number of the French, after they had all reached the field, was, in truth, about seven thousand; at the beginning of the fight it seems not to have exceeded five thousand.  The Relation de la seconde Bataille de Quebec says:  “Notre petite armee consistoit au moment de l’action en 3,000 hommes de troupes reglees et 2,000 Canadiens ou sauvages.”  A large number of Canadians came up from Sillery while the affair went on, and as the whole French army, except the detachments mentioned by Garneau, had passed the night at no greater distance from the field than Ste-Foy and Sillery, the last man must have reached it before the firing was half over.

Index

   A
   Abenaki Indians, 50, 122, 157, 262, 335
     destruction of their town, 520

   Abercromby, James, British general, 270, 409, 410, 432, 434, 460
     arrives in Albany, 280
     praises Robert Rogers, 309, 310n.
     joy at fall of Louisbourg, 404
     Wolfe’s comments on, 411
     his blunders, 418, 428
     attacks Ticonderoga (1758), 422-424
     his defeat, 425
     his retreat, 426

   Abraham, heights of, 523 (See also Quebec)
     Wolfe’s plan to climb, 521-532, 537
     guarded by Captain de Vergor, 533, 535
     surprised and captured, 540

   Abraham, Plains of, 542 (See also Quebec)
     Wolfe’s army forms on, 542
     battle for Quebec on, 544-550
     rout of French forces,. 546-550
     behavior of Canadians, 549-550
     French and English losses, 547n.-548, 552, 637-638
     report of battle on, 638-639

   Acadia (Nova Scotia), Conflict for, 82-106
     conquered by Nicholson, 82
     ceded to England (1713), 82
     guaranteed religious freedom, 82, 87
     hostility of French-Canadian authorities, 82, 84, 174-175
     English patience and moderation, 83, 85, 94-96, 175
     Halifax founded, 84
     treachery of French clergy, 86-102
     British seize ship in, 97
     British-French disputes over boundaries, 102-105
     failure to settle boundary disputes, 105
     life in, 189-190
     emigration under French pressure (1748-1755), 17n.
     its value to France, 175-176
     British remove settlers, 186-205
     delay in finding British settlers, 205

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Montcalm and Wolfe from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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