Montcalm and Wolfe eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 771 pages of information about Montcalm and Wolfe.
en abondance toute la nuit de tout genre et de toute espece et on ne se retira qu’a sept heures du matin.  Pour moi qui ay quitte le sejour de Quebec, Je me couchai de bonne heure.  J’avais eu ce jour-la huit dames a souper et ce souper etait dedie a Mad.  Varin.  Demain j’en aurai une demi douzaine.  Je ne sais encore a qui il est dedie, Je suis tente de croire que c’est a La Roche Beaucourt Le galant Chev’r. nous donne encore un bal.”

Appendix F

Chapter 15.  Fort William Henry

WEBB TO LOUDON, FORT EDWARD, 11 AUG. 1757.

Public Record Office. (Extract.)

“On leaving the Camp Yesterday Morning they [the English soldiers] were stript by the Indians of everything they had both Officers and Men the Women and Children drag’d from among them and most inhumanly butchered before their faces, the party of about three hundred Men which were given them as an escort were during this time quietly looking on, from this and other circumstances we are too well convinced these barbarities must have been connived at by the French.  After having destroyed the women and children they fell upon the rear of our Men who running in upon the Front soon put the whole to a most precipitate flight in which confusion part of them came into this Camp about two o’Clock yesterday morning in a most distressing situation, and have continued dropping in ever since, a great many men and we are afraid several Officers were massacred.”

The above is independent of the testimony of Frye, who did not reach Fort Edward till the day after Webb’s letter was written.

FRYE TO THOMAS HUBBARD, SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF MASSACHUSETTS, ALBANY, 16 AUG. 1757.

Public Record Office. (Extract.)

“We did not march till ye 10th at which time the Savages were let loose upon us, Strips, Kills, & Scalps our people drove them into Disorder Rendered it impossible to Rally, the French Gaurds we were promised shou’d Escort us to Fort Edward Could or would not protect us so that there Opened the most horrid Scene of Barbarity immaginable, I was strip’d myself of my Arms & Cloathing that I had nothing left but Briches Stockings Shoes & Shirt, the Indians round me with their Tomehawks Spears &c threatening Death I flew to the Officers of the French Gaurds for Protection but they would afford me none, therefore was Oblig’d to fly and was in the woods till the 12th in the Morning of which I arriv’d at Fort Edward almost Famished ... with what of Fatigue Starving &c I am obliged to break off but as soon as I can Recollect myself shall write to you more fully.”

FRYE, JOURNAL OF THE ATTACK OF FORT WILLIAM HENRY.

Public Record Office. (Extract.)

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Montcalm and Wolfe from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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