The White Linen Nurse eBook

Eleanor Hallowell Abbott
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 133 pages of information about The White Linen Nurse.

Title:  The White Linen Nurse

Author:  Eleanor Hallowell Abbott

Release Date:  December 29, 2004 [EBook #14506]

Language:  English

Character set encoding:  ASCII

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The White Linen Nurse

By Eleanor Hallowell Abbott

Author of “Molly Make-Believe,” “The Sick-a-Bed Lady,” etc., etc.

1913

TO MAURICE HOWE RICHARDSON

Who loved romance almost as much as he loved surgery, this little story is affectionately dedicated in token of two Personsunfading memories

THE WHITE LINEN NURSE

CHAPTER I

The White Linen Nurse was so tired that her noble expression ached.

Incidentally her head ached and her shoulders ached and her lungs ached and the ankle-bones of both feet ached quite excruciatingly.  But nothing of her felt permanently incapacitated except her noble expression.  Like a strip of lip-colored lead suspended from her poor little nose by two tugging wire-gray wrinkles her persistently conscientious sickroom smile seemed to be whanging aimlessly against her front teeth.  The sensation certainly was very unpleasant.

Looking back thus on the three spine-curving, chest-cramping, foot-twinging, ether-scented years of her hospital training, it dawned on the White Linen Nurse very suddenly that nothing of her ever had felt permanently incapacitated except her noble expression!

Impulsively she sprang for the prim white mirror that capped her prim white bureau and stood staring up into her own entrancing, bright-colored Novia Scotian reflection with tense and unwonted interest.

Except for the unmistakable smirk which fatigue had clawed into her plastic young mouth-lines there was certainly nothing special the matter with what she saw.

“Perfectly good face!” she attested judicially with no more than common courtesy to her progenitors.  “Perfectly good and tidy looking face!  If only—­if only—­” her breath caught a trifle.  “If only—­it didn’t look so disgustingly noble and—­hygienic—­and dollish!”

All along the back of her neck little sharp prickly pains began suddenly to sting and burn.

“Silly—­simpering—­pink and white puppet!” she scolded squintingly, “I’ll teach you how to look like a real girl!”

Very threateningly she raised herself to her tiptoes and thrust her glowing, corporeal face right up into the moulten, elusive, quick-silver face in the mirror.  Pink for pink, blue for blue, gold for gold, dollish smirk for dollish smirk, the mirror mocked her seething inner fretfulness.

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The White Linen Nurse from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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