A Handbook to the Works of Browning (6th ed.) eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 381 pages of information about A Handbook to the Works of Browning (6th ed.).
Vol. xii. page 5.  The Firm Miranda—­Mellerio, Brothers.
"    "   7.  St Rambert—­St. Aubin.
"    "   7.  Joyeux, Joyous-Gard—­Lion, Lionesse.
"    "   8.  Vire-Caen.
"    "  19.  St. Rambertese—­St. Aubinese
"    "  22.  Londres—­Douvres.
"    "  22.  London—­Dover.
"    "  22.  La Roche—­Courcelle.
"    "  22.  Monlieu—­Bernieres.
"    "  22.  Villeneuve—­Langrune.
"    "  22.  Pons—­Luc.
"    "  22.  La Ravissante—­La Delivrande.
"    "  25.  Raimbaux—­Bayeux.
"    "  25.  Morillon—­Hugonin.
"    "  25.  Mirecourt—­Bonnechose.
"    "  25.  Miranda—­Mellerio.
"    "  26.  New York—­Madrid.
"    "  30.  Clairvaux—­Tailleville.
"    "  31.  Gonthier—­Beny.
"    "  31.  Rousseau—­Voltaire.
"    "  31.  Leonce—­Antoine.
"    "  36.  Of “Firm Miranda, London and New York”—­“Mellerio
Brothers”—­Meller, people say.
"    "  53.  Rare Vissante—­Dell Yvrande.
"    "  53.  Aldabert—­Regnobert.
"    "  53.  Eldebert—­Ragnebert.
"    "  54.  Mailleville—­Beaudoin.
"    "  54.  Chaumont—­Quelen.
"    "  54.  Vertgalant—­Talleyrand.
"    "  59.  Ravissantish—­Delivrandish.
"    "  66.  Clara de Millefleurs—­Anna de Beaupre.
"    "  67.  Coliseum Street—­Miromesnil Street.
"    "  72.  Sterner—­Mayer.
"    "  72.  Commercy—­Larocy.
"    "  72.  Sierck—­Metz.
"    "  73.  Muhlhausen—­Debacker.
"    "  73.  Carlino Centofanti—­Miranda di Mongino.
"    "  73.  Portugal—­Italy.
"    "  88.  Vaillant-Meriel.
"    "  96.  Thirty-three—­Twenty-five.
"    "  97.  Beaumont—­Pasquier.
"    " 107.  Sceaux—­Garges.
"    " 128.  Luc de la Maison Rouge—­Jean de la Becquetiere.
"    " 128.  Claise—­Vire.
"    " 129.  Maude—­Anne.
"    " 129.  Dionysius—­Eliezer.
"    " 129.  Scolastica—­Elizabeth.
"    " 136.  Twentieth—­Thirteenth.
"    " 152.  Fricquot—­Picot.
]

[Footnote 81:  Le Croisic is in the Loire Inferieure, at the south-east corner of Brittany.  It has now a good bathing establishment, and is much frequented by French people; but sardine-fishing and the crystallizing of sea-salt are still its standing occupations.]

[Footnote 82:  The details of this worship as carried on in the island opposite Le Croisic, and which Mr. Browning describes, are mentioned by Strabo.]

[Footnote 83:  The story of Paul Desforges Maillard forms the subject of a famous play, Piron’s “Metromanie.”]

[Footnote 84:  It is also, and perhaps chiefly, in this case, a pun on the meaning of the plural noun “cenci,” “rags,” or “old rags.”  The cry of this, frequent in Rome, was at first mistaken by Shelley for a voice urging him to go on with his play.  Mr. Browning has used it to indicate the comparative unimportance of his contribution to the Cenci story.  The quoted Italian proverb means something to the same effect:  that every trifle will press in for notice among worthier matters.]

[Footnote 85:  That of the Gregorian chant:  a cadence concluding on the dominant instead of the key-note.]

[Footnote 86:  We have a conspicuous instance of this in “Pippa Passes.”]

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
A Handbook to the Works of Browning (6th ed.) from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook