Narrative of Services in the Liberation of Chili, Peru and Brazil, eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 245 pages of information about Narrative of Services in the Liberation of Chili, Peru and Brazil,.

   July 19th.  Went on board the Pedro Primiero to pay advance. 
   (Paid May and Lukin 15,000 dollars.) Engaged all day in paying
   the men.

July 26th. Went to the Pedro, with the Admiral and Lieutenant Blake, to pay advance from the prize-money.  In the evening the Emperor called and announced to the Admiral that he was to sail on Sunday next.

   July 31st.  On board the Pedro paying seamen as before. 
   Soldiers came on board.

   August 2nd. Emperor came alongside.  Admiral embarked. 
   Got under way, and set sail in company with the Maranhao brig
   and three transports.

The preceding extracts shew that not only was an advance made for the good of the service, but this was done with such publicity, that both the Emperor and his ministers could not fail to be aware of the circumstance.  The further distribution as prize-money, according to His Majesty’s direction, took place at Bahia and Pernambuco, as will be shewn in the next chapter.

CHAPTER VIII.

REPUBLICAN GOVERNMENT PROCLAIMED AT PERNAMBUCO—­ITS CONCORDAT——­THE
PRESIDENT CARVALHO—­THREAT OF BOMBARDMENT—­A BRIBE OFFERED TO ME AND
REFUSED—­THE REVOLT ADMITTED OF PALLIATION—­IT WAS FAST BECOMING
GENERAL—­INTIMIDATION INEFFECTUAL—­THE REVOLUTIONISTS EXPECT FOREIGN
AID—­PERNAMBUCO TAKEN POSSESSION OF—­PAYMENT OF PRIZE MONEY—­THE
ACCOUNTS RENDERED IN DUE COURSE—­ORDERS TO PUT DOWN REVOLT AT
PARA—­CHARACTER OF THE REVOLUTION—­DIFFICULTY IN FINDING PROPER
GOVERNORS—­REVOLT AT CEARA—­STEPS TAKEN TO SUPPRESS IT—­THEY PROVE
SUCCESSFUL—­THE INSURGENT LEADER KILLED—­MEASURES FOR PRESERVING
TRANQUILLITY.

On the 2nd of August, 1824, the Imperial squadron again quitted Rio de Janeiro, the rendezvous being appointed at Jurugua, where we arrived on the 13th, and on the 16th landed a body of twelve hundred troops under General Lima, at Alagoas, seventy or eighty miles from the seat of revolt! this notable step being taken in pursuance of strict orders from the Administration at Rio de Janeiro.

On the 18th, the squadron reached Pernambuco, falling in, near the entrance of the port, with a number of Portuguese vessels quitting the city with passengers; but in consequence of the prize tribunal having decreed damages for the seizure of enemy’s ships within a certain distance of the coast, they were permitted to pass unmolested.

We did not reach Pernambuco too soon, for proclamations had been issued by Manuel Carvalho Paes de Andrade, the revolutionary President—­denouncing Don Pedro as a traitor, whose aim it was to abandon Brazil to the Portuguese; which denunciation, though right in one sense, was wrong as regarded the Emperor, whose views were thoroughly national—­though the object of his ministers was as thoroughly Portuguese.  Had the Pernambucans been aware of the want of concord between the Emperor’s intentions and those of his ministers, who had forced themselves upon him—­the probability is that they would have supported, instead of denouncing his government.

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Narrative of Services in the Liberation of Chili, Peru and Brazil, from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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