A Supplement to A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 457 pages of information about A Supplement to A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents.

ANNOUNCEMENT TO THE VICE-PRESIDENT.

At the residence of Mr. Ansley Wilcox, 641 Delaware Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y., Mr. Root stepped forward and said, with deep emotion:  “Mr. Vice-President, I have been requested on behalf of the Cabinet of the late President—­at least those who are present in Buffalo, all except two—­to request that for reasons of weight affecting the affairs of Government you should proceed to take the constitutional oath of President of the United States.”

THE VICE-PRESIDENT’S REPLY.

“I shall take the oath at once in accordance with your request, and in this hour of deep and terrible national bereavement.  I wish to state that it shall be my aim to continue absolutely unbroken the policy of President McKinley for the peace and prosperity and honor of our beloved country.”

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE ASSASSINATION TO REPRESENTATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES ABROAD.

(From the Washington Post, Sept. 15, 1901.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, Sept. 14.

Sir:  It is my painful duty to announce to you the death of William McKinley, President of the United States, in the city of Buffalo, at fifteen minutes past 2 in the morning of to-day, September 14.

Laid low by the act of an assassin, the week-long struggle to save his life has been watched with keen solicitude, not alone by the people of this country, who raised him from their own ranks to the high office he filled, but by the people of all friendly nations, whose messages of sympathy and hope, while hope was possible, have been most consolatory in this time of sore trial.

Now that the end has come, I request you to be the medium of communicating the sad tidings to the Government of the honored nation you so worthily represent, and to announce that in obedience to the prescriptions of the Constitution, the office of President has devolved upon Theodore Roosevelt, Vice-President of the United States.

Accept, sir, the renewed assurance of my highest consideration.

JOHN HAY.

ANNOUNCEMENT TO THE ARMY.

[GENERAL ORDER No. 13.]

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,
  ADJUTANT GENERAL’S OFFICE,
    Washington, D.C.  Sept. 16, 1901.

With great sorrow, the commanding general announces the death of William McKinley, President of the United States and, by statute, Commander-in-Chief of the District of Columbia Militia, which occurred at Buffalo, N.Y., at 2:15 o’clock A.M. on September 14, 1901.

Throughout his tragically terminated administration President McKinley was actively interested in the welfare of this organization and frequently gave it evidence of his sincere friendship.  His distinguished services as soldier and civilian must incite to emulation and will result in purer patriotism and better citizenship wherever his career is studied.

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A Supplement to A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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