A Supplement to A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 457 pages of information about A Supplement to A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents.

Whereas it is also provided by said section that “the existence of either of the conditions aforesaid shall be determined by the President of the United States by proclamation made from time to time as the purposes of this act may require;” and

Whereas satisfactory official assurances have been given that in the Kingdom of the Netherlands and in the Netherlands’ possessions the law permits to citizens of the United States of America the benefit of copyright on substantially the same basis as to subjects of the Netherlands: 

Now, therefore, I, William McKinley, President of the United States of America, do declare and proclaim that the first of the conditions specified in section 13 of the act of March 3, 1891, now exists and is fulfilled in respect to the subjects of the Netherlands.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 20th day of November, A.D. 1899, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fourth.

WILLIAM McKINLEY.

By the President: 
  JOHN HAY,
    Secretary of State.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

A PROCLAMATION.

To the People of the United States

Garret Augustus Hobart, Vice-President of the United States, died at his home in Paterson, New Jersey, at 8:30 o’clock this morning.  In him the Nation has lost one of its most illustrious citizens and one of its most faithful servants.  His participation in the business life, and the law-making body of his native State was marked by unswerving fidelity and by a high order of talents and attainments; and his too brief career as Vice-President of the United States and President of the Senate exhibited the loftiest qualities of upright and sagacious statesmanship.  In the world of affairs he had few equals among his contemporaries.  His private character was gentle and noble.  He will long be mourned by his friends as a man of singular purity and attractiveness whose sweetness of disposition won all hearts, while his elevated purposes, his unbending integrity and whole-hearted devotion to the public good deserved and acquired universal respect and esteem.

In sorrowing testimony of the loss which has fallen upon the country, I direct that on the day of the funeral the Executive Offices of the United States shall be closed and all posts and stations of the Army and Navy shall display the national flag at half-mast, and that the representatives of the United States in foreign countries shall pay appropriate tribute to the illustrious dead for a period of thirty days.

In witness whereof I have set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

[SEAL.]

Done at the city of Washington, this 21st day of November, A.D. 1899, and of the Independence of the United States the one hundred and twenty-fourth.

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A Supplement to A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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