Historical View of the Languages and Literature of the Slavic eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 454 pages of information about Historical View of the Languages and Literature of the Slavic.

Origin of the Lekhes, or Poles, 222.—­Periods, 225.—­Extent of the Polish language, 225.—­Its ancient character, 227.—­FIRST PERIOD, 229.—­SECOND PERIOD, 231.—­THIRD PERIOD, 235.—­Rapid progress of literature, 235.—­Toleration, 236.—­Dissidents, Unitarians, etc. 236.—­Culture of the language, 240.—­Printing offices and schools, 241.—­Degradation of the peasantry, 241.—­Copernicus, 243,—­Writers, 244.—­FOURTH PERIOD, 250.—­Perversion of taste, 251.—­Theological controversy and persecution, 252.—­The Jesuits prevail, 253.—­Poets, 255—­FIFTH PERIOD, 256.—­Revival, French influence, 257.—­Political struggles, 258.—­Schools and cultivation, 259.—­The peasantry were serfs, etc. 260.—­Literary activity, 262.—­Effect of French influence, 263.—­Writers, 264.—­Czartoryski, 265.—­The family Potocki, 266.—­Lelewel, 268—­Niemcewicz, 275.—­SIXTH PERIOD, 285.—­Causes of the revolution in 1830, 285.—­Results upon literature, 286.—­Russian efforts to destroy Polish nationality, 287.—­Historical researches, 288.—­Literature of Polish emigrants, 291.—­Lelewel, 292.—­Mickiewicz, 293.—­Recent poetry, 297—­Works on the Polish language, etc. 298.

CHAPTER III.

LANGUAGES OF THE SORABIAN-VENDES IN LUSATIA, AND OF OTHER.  VENDISH TRIBES NOW EXTINCT.

History, 298.—­Branches:  The Obotrites, 300.—­The Wiltzi, or Pomeranians, 302.—­The Ukern in Brandenburg, 303.—­The Sorabians or Vendes in Lusatia, 304.

1. Vendes in Upper Lusatia.

Language, 308.—­Influence of the Reformation, 308.—­Two systems of orthography, 310.—­Literary efforts, 311.

2. Vendes in Lower Lusatia.

Language, 313.—­Literature mostly religious, 313.—­Philological works, 314.

Part Fourth.

SKETCH OF THE POPULAR POETRY OF THE SLAVIC NATIONS.

SLAVIC POPULAR POETRY:  Difficulties of the subject, 315.—­Still flourishes only among Slavic nations, 317.—­Its antiquity and prevalence, 318.—­Nothing in it of romance, 319.—­Different moral standard, 320.—­Nothing dramatic, 322.—­Sometimes allegorical, 323—­Elegy, 323.—­Antithesis, 324.—­Standing epithets, 325.—­Plastic, 325.—­Personifications, 327.—­Superstitions, 328.—­Jelitza and her Brothers, 329.—­Moral characteristics, 332.—­Love and heroism, 334.—­Hopeless love, 336.—­The Farewell, 336.—­A mother’s and sister’s love, 338.

EASTERN SLAVI.

RUSSIAN POPULAR POETRY, 339.—­Character and antiquity, 339.—­Tenderness, 342.—­The Postilion, 343.—­Diminutives, 344.—­Melancholy, 344.—­Hopeless love, 344.—­Parting Scene, 346.—­The Dove, 347—­The Faithless Lover, 349.—­Veneration for the Tzar, 350.—­The Boyar’s Execution, 350.—­The storming of Azof, 353.—­Malo-Russian songs, 354.—­The Kozaks, 355.—­Their history, 356.—­Their ballads, 358—­The murder of Yessaul Tshural, 359.—­Lament for Yessaul Pushkar, 360—­Song of the Haidamack, 362.—­Sir Sava and the Leshes, 363.—­The Love-sick Girl, 365.—­The Dead Love, 366.

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Historical View of the Languages and Literature of the Slavic from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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