The History of the Great Irish Famine of 1847 (3rd ed.) (1902) eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 575 pages of information about The History of the Great Irish Famine of 1847 (3rd ed.) (1902).
The Soup-kitchen Act—­The harvest of 1847—­Out-door Relief Act—­Great extension of out-door relief—­Number relieved—­Parliamentary papers—­Perplexing—­Misleading—­Sums voted—­Sums expended—­Sums remitted—­Total Treasury advances under various Acts—­Total remissions—­Sum actually given as a free gift to meet the Famine—­Charitable Associations—­Sums collected and disbursed by them—­Two Queen’s Letters—­Amount raised by them—­Assisting distressed Unions—­Feeding and clothing school children—­Feeling about the Irish Famine in America—­Meetings throughout the Union—­Subscriptions—­Money—­Food—­Number of Ships sent to Ireland with Provisions—­Freight of Provisions—­Ships of War—­The “Jamestown” and “Macedonian”—­Various Theories about the Blight—­The Religious Theory—­Peculiar—­Quotations—­Rev. Hugh M’Neill—­Charles Dickens—­The Catholic Cantons of Switzerland—­Belgium—­France—­The Rhenish Provinces—­Proselytism—­Various causes for Conversions assigned—­The late Archbishop Whately’s Opinions—­His Convert—­He rejects the idea that Converts were bought—­Statement of the late Archdeacon O’Sullivan—­Dr. Forbes on the Conversions in the West—­Mr. M’Carthy Downing’s Letter—­The Subscription of L1,000—­Baron Dowse—­Conclusion 505

(NOTE A.)—­Absenteeism:  Mr. M’Culloch’s defence of it examined, 522

(NOTE B.)—­Smith O’Brien’s refusal to serve on a Committee of the House of Commons, 556

(NOTE C.)—­Treasury Minute, dated August 31st, 1846 541

(NOTE D.)—­The “Labouchere Letter,” Authorizing Reproductive Employment, 549

THE GREAT FAMINE OF 1847,

ETC.

CHAPTER I.

The Potato—­Its introduction into Europe—­Sir Walter Raleigh—­The Potato of Virginia—­The Battata, or sweet Potato—­Sir John Hawkins—­Sir Francis Drake—­Raleigh’s numerous exploring expeditions—­Story of his distributing Potatoes on the Irish coast on his way from Virginia groundless—­Sir Joseph Banks—­His history of the introduction of the Potato—­Thomas Heriot—­His description of the Opanawk a correct description of the Potato—­That root in Europe before Raleigh’s time—­Raleigh an “Undertaker”—­The Grants made to him—­The Famine after the War with the Desmonds—­Introduction of the Potato into Ireland—­Did not come rapidly into cultivation—­Food of the poorest—­Grazing—­Graziers—­Destruction of Irish Manufactures—­Causes of the increasing culture of the Potato—­Improvement of Agriculture—­Rotation of Crops—­Primate Boulter’s charity—­Buys Corn in the South to sell it cheaply in the North—­Years of scarcity from 1720 to 1740—­The Famine of 1740-41—­The Great Frost—­No combined effort to meet this Famine—­Vast number of Deaths—­The Obelisk at Castletown
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The History of the Great Irish Famine of 1847 (3rd ed.) (1902) from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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