The Tale of Benjamin Bunny eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 4 pages of information about The Tale of Benjamin Bunny.

It had been sown with lettuces.

They left a great many odd little footmarks all over the bed, especially little Benjamin, who was wearing clogs.

[Illustration]

[Illustration]

Little Benjamin said that the first thing to be done was to get back Peter’s clothes, in order that they might be able to use the pocket-handkerchief.

They took them off the scarecrow.  There had been rain during the night; there was water in the shoes, and the coat was somewhat shrunk.

Benjamin tried on the tam-o’-shanter, but it was too big for him.

Then he suggested that they should fill the pocket-handkerchief with onions, as a little present for his Aunt.

Peter did not seem to be enjoying himself; he kept hearing noises.

[Illustration]

[Illustration]

Benjamin, on the contrary, was perfectly at home, and ate a lettuce leaf.  He said that he was in the habit of coming to the garden with his father to get lettuces for their Sunday dinner.

(The name of little Benjamin’s papa was old Mr. Benjamin Bunny.)

The lettuces certainly were very fine.

Peter did not eat anything; he said he should like to go home.  Presently he dropped half the onions.

[Illustration]

[Illustration]

Little Benjamin said that it was not possible to get back up the pear-tree with a load of vegetables.  He led the way boldly towards the other end of the garden.  They went along a little walk on planks, under a sunny, red brick wall.

The mice sat on their doorsteps cracking cherry-stones; they winked at
Peter Rabbit and little Benjamin Bunny.

Presently Peter let the pocket-handkerchief go again.

[Illustration]

[Illustration]

They got amongst flower-pots, and frames, and tubs.  Peter heard noises worse than ever; his eyes were as big as lolly-pops!

He was a step or two in front of his cousin when he suddenly stopped.

This is what those little rabbits saw round that corner!

Little Benjamin took one look, and then, in half a minute less than no time, he hid himself and Peter and the onions underneath a large basket....

[Illustration]

[Illustration]

The cat got up and stretched herself, and came and sniffed at the basket.

Perhaps she liked the smell of onions!

Anyway, she sat down upon the top of the basket.

She sat there for five hours.

* * * * *

I cannot draw you a picture of Peter and Benjamin underneath the basket, because it was quite dark, and because the smell of onions was fearful; it made Peter Rabbit and little Benjamin cry.

The sun got round behind the wood, and it was quite late in the afternoon; but still the cat sat upon the basket.

[Illustration]

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Tale of Benjamin Bunny from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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