The Worst Journey in the World eBook

Apsley Cherry-Garrard
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 876 pages of information about The Worst Journey in the World.

[68] Terra Nova Natural History Report, Cetacea, vol. i.  No. 3,
p. 111, by Lillie.

[69] Terra Nova Natural History Report, Zoology, vol. i.  No. 3,
Cetacea, by D. G. Lillie, p. 114.

[70] Discovery Natural History Report, Zoology, vol. ii. part i.
pp. 3-4, by E. A. Wilson.

[71] Scott’s Last Expedition, vol. i. p. 22.

[72] Wilson’s Journal, Scott’s Last Expedition, vol. i. p. 613.

[73] Minute plants.

[74] Killer whale.

[75] Officers’ mess on the Terra Nova.

    [76] Griffith Taylor in South Polar Times.

    [77] Scott’s Last Expedition, vol. i. p. 35.

    [78] Ibid. p. 39.

    [79] Ibid. pp. 54, 55.

    [80] Scott’s Last Expedition, vol. i. p. 56.

    [81] Scott’s Last Expedition, vol. i. pp. 73-75.

    [82] Scott’s Last Expedition, vol. i. p. 62.

    [83] Scott’s Last Expedition, vol. i. pp. 68, 69.

CHAPTER IV

LAND

Beyond this flood a frozen continent
Lies dark and wilde, beat with perpetual storms
Of whirlwind and dire hail, which on firm land
Thaws not, but gathers heap, and ruin seems
Of ancient pile; all else deep snow and ice.... 

          
                                                  MILTON, Paradise Lost, II.

“They say it’s going to blow like hell.  Go and look at the glass.”  Thus Titus Oates quietly to me a few hours before we left the pack.

I went and looked at the barograph and it made me feel sea-sick.  Within a few hours I was sick, very sick; but we newcomers to the Antarctic had yet to learn that we knew nothing about its barometer.  Nothing very terrible happened after all.  When I got up to the bridge for the morning watch we were in open water and it was blowing fresh.  It freshened all day, and by the evening it was blowing a southerly with a short choppy North Sea swell, and very warm.  By 4 A.M. the next morning there was a big sea running and the dogs and ponies were having a bad time.  Rennick had the morning watch these days, and I was his humble midshipman.

At 5.45 we sighted what we thought was a berg on the port bow.  About three minutes later Rennick said, “There’s a bit of pack,” and I went below and reported to Evans.  It was very thick with driving snow and also foggy, and before Evans got up to the bridge we were quite near the pack, and amongst bits which had floated from it, one of which must have been our berg.  We took in the headsails as quickly as possible, these being the only sails set, and nosed along dead slow to leeward under steam alone.  Gradually we could see either pack or the blink of it all along our port and starboard beam, while gradually we felt our way down a big patch of open water.

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