The Electra of Euripides eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 56 pages of information about The Electra of Euripides.

CLYTEMNESTRA.

I dare not!...  Yes, I fear him.  ’Tis mine own
Life, and not his, comes first.  And rumour saith
His heart yet burneth for his father’s death.

ELECTRA.

Why dost thou keep thine husband ever hot
Against me?

CLYTEMNESTRA.

’Tis his mood.  And thou art not
So gentle, child!

ELECTRA.

My spirit is too sore! 
Howbeit, from this day I will no more
Hate him.

CLYTEMNESTRA (with a flash of hope).

O daughter!—­Then, indeed, shall he,
I promise, never more be harsh to thee!

ELECTRA.

He lieth in my house, as ’twere his own. 
’Tis that hath made him proud.

CLYTEMNESTRA.

Nay, art thou flown
To strife again so quick, child?

ELECTRA.

Well; I say
No more; long have I feared him, and alway
Shall fear him, even as now!

CLYTEMNESTRA.

Nay, daughter, peace! 
It bringeth little profit, speech like this... 
Why didst thou call me hither?

ELECTRA.

It reached thee,
My word that a man-child is born to me? 
Do thou make offering for me—­for the rite
I know not—­as is meet on the tenth night. 
I cannot; I have borne no child till now.

CLYTEMNESTRA.

Who tended thee?  ’Tis she should make the vow.

ELECTRA.

None tended me.  Alone I bare my child.

CLYTEMNESTRA

What, is thy cot so friendless?  And this wild
So far from aid?

ELECTRA.

Who seeks for friendship sake
A beggar’s house?

CLYTEMNESTRA.

I will go in, and make
Due worship for thy child, the Peace-bringer. 
To all thy need I would be minister. 
Then to my lord, where by the meadow side
He prays the woodland nymphs. 
Ye handmaids, guide
My chariot to the stall, and when ye guess
The rite draws near its end, in readiness
Be here again.  Then to my lord!...  I owe
My lord this gladness, too.

[The Attendants depart; CLYTEMNESTRA, left alone, proceeds to enter the house.

ELECTRA.

Welcome below
My narrow roof!  But have a care withal,
A grime of smoke lies deep upon the wall. 
Soil not thy robe!... 
Not far now shall it be,
The sacrifice God asks of me and thee. 
The bread of Death is broken, and the knife
Lifted again that drank the Wild Bull’s life: 
And on his breast....  Ha, Mother, hast slept well
Aforetime?  Thou shalt lie with him in Hell. 
That grace I give to cheer thee on thy road;
Give thou to me—­peace from my father’s blood!
[She follows her mother into the house.

CHORUS.

  Lo, the returns of wrong. 
    The wind as a changed thing
  Whispereth overhead
  Of one that of old lay dead
  In the water lapping long: 
    My King, O my King!

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Electra of Euripides from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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