Forgot your password?  
Related Topics

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 143 pages of information about Native Races and the War.

FOOTNOTES: 

[Footnote 19:  Blue Book, C. p. 28, 2673.]

[Footnote 20:  Blue Book, C. 2454, p. 57.]

[Footnote 21:  Life and Correspondence of Sir Bartle Frere, by J. Martineau.]

[Footnote 22:  Life and Correspondence of Sir Bartle Frere, by J. Martineau.]

[Footnote 23:  The italics are my own.]

[Footnote 24:  There are between sixty and seventy resolutions and addresses recorded in the Blue-book, all passed unanimously except in one case, at Stellenbosch where a minority opposed the resolution.  The spokesman of the minority, however, based his opposition not on Frere’s general policy, still less on his character, but as a protest against an Excise Act, which was one of Mr. Spring’s measures.]

[Footnote 25:  Life and Correspondence of Sir Bartle Frere.]

[Footnote 26:  Blue Book, C. 2740, p. 46.]

[Footnote 27:  Blue Book, C. 2740, p. 63.]

[Footnote 28:  Life and Correspondence of the Right Hon. Sir Bartle Frere, by Martineau.]

[Footnote 29:  In the sense in which the great Lord Chatham used the words.]

VII.

     TRANSVAAL POLICY SINCE 1884.  DELIMITATION OF BOUNDARY AGREED TO AND
     NOT OBSERVED. THE CHIEF MONTSIOA.  HIS COUNTRY PLACED UNDER BRITISH
     PROTECTION.  TRANSVAAL LAW.  THE GRONDWET OR CONSTITUTION.  THE HIGH
     COURTS OF JUSTICE SUBSERVIENT TO THE VOLKSRAAD OR PARLIAMENT. 
     ARTICLE 9 OF THE GRONDWET REFERRING TO NATIVES.  NATIVE MARRIAGE
     LAWS.  THE PASS SYSTEM.  MISPLACED GOVERNMENTAL TITLES,—­REPUBLIC,
     EMPIRE, ETC.

The Boer policy towards the natives did not undergo any change for the better from 1881 and onwards.

At the time of the rising of the Boers against the British Protectorate, which culminated in the battle of Majuba Hill and the retrocession of the Transvaal, a number of native chiefs in districts outside the Transvaal boundary, sent to the British Commissioner for native affairs to offer their aid to the British Government, and many of them took the “loyals” of the Transvaal under their protection.  One of these was Montsioa, a Christian chief of the Barolong tribe.  He and other chiefs took charge of Government property and cattle during the disturbances, and one had four or five thousand pounds in gold, the product of a recently collected tax, given him to take care of by the Commissioner of his district, who was afraid that the money would be seized by the Boers. In, every instance the property entrusted to their charge was returned intact.  The loyalty of all the native chiefs under very trying circumstances, is a remarkable proof of the great affection of the Kaffirs, and more especially those of the Basuto tribes, who love peace better than war, for the Queen’s rule.  I will cite one other instance among many of the gladness with which different native races placed themselves under the protection of the Queen.

Follow Us on Facebook