Native Races and the War eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 143 pages of information about Native Races and the War.

Now what are the articles to which the Boer Government here objects, and has continued to object?

Article 15 enacts that no slavery or apprenticeship shall be tolerated.

Article 16 provides for religious toleration (for Natives and all alike.)

Article 26 provides for the free movement, trading, and residence of all persons, other than natives, conforming themselves to the laws of the Transvaal.

Article 27 gives to all, (Natives included,) the right of free access to the Courts of Justice.

Putting the “sense of honour” of the Transvaal Volksraad out of the question, past experience had but too plainly proved that these Articles were by no means superfluous.

FOOTNOTES: 

[Footnote 16:  “Austral Africa, Ruling it or Losing it,” p. 157.]

[Footnote 17:  When the Transvaal was annexed, in 1877, the public debt of that country amounted to L301,727.  “Under British rule this debt was liquidated to the extent of L150,000, but the total was brought up by a Parliamentary grant, a loan from the Standard Bank, and sundries to L390,404, which represented the public debt of the Transvaal on the 31st December, 1880.  This was further increased by monies advanced by the Standard Bank and English Exchequer during the war, and till the 8th August, 1881, (during which time the country yielded no revenue,) to L457,393.  To this must be added an estimated sum of L200,000 for compensation charges, pension allowances, &c., and a further sum of L383,000, the cost of the successful expedition against Secocoemi, that of the unsuccessful one being left out of account, bringing up the total public debt to over a million, of which about L800,000 was owing to this country.  This sum the Commissioners (Sir Evelyn Wood dissenting) reduced by a stroke of the pen to L265,000, thus entirely remitting an approximate sum of L500,000 or L600,000.  To the sum of L265,000 still owing must be added say another L150,000 for sums lately advanced to pay the compensation claims, bringing up the actual amount owing to England to about a quarter of a million.”—­Report of Assistant Secretary to the British Agent for Native Affairs. (Blue Book 3917, 46.)]

[Footnote 18:  “Austral Africa.”  Mackenzie.]

VI.

     THE CAREER AND RECALL OF SIR BARTLE FRERE.  UNFORTUNATE EFFECT IN
     SOUTH AFRICA OF PARTY SPIRIT IN POLITICS AT HOME.  DEATH OF SIR
     BARTLE FRERE.  THE GREAT PRINCIPLES OF BRITISH GOVERNMENT AND LAW. 
     HOPE FOR SOUTH AFRICA IF THESE ARE MAINTAINED AND OBSERVED. WORDS
     OF MR. GLADSTONE ON THE COLONIZING SPIRIT OF ENGLISHMEN.

The case of Sir Bartle Frere illustrates forcibly the inexpediency of allowing our party differences at home to sow the seeds of discord in a distant Colony, and the apparent injustices to which such action may give rise.

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Native Races and the War from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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