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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 101 pages of information about The Fall of the Grand Sarrasin.

NOTE E.

The Sarrazins in Guernsey.—­“According to tradition the northern freebooters, who were termed by the old French historians Sarrazins, Anglice Saracens, established themselves in Guernsey, where they erected a stronghold, which was named, probably after their leader, Le Chastel du Grand Jeffroi, and it appears also to have borne the name of the Chastel of the Grand Sarrazin.  This castle was situated on an eminence nearly in the centre of the island, and commanded an extensive view of the ocean, and of many of the landing-places as well as of the coast of Normandy” (F.B.  Tupper, “History of Guernsey,” p. 21).

NOTE F.

The Expedition of Samson d’Anville.—­“[Guernsey], in the year 1061, is stated to have been attacked by a new race of pirates, who, according to Berry (p. 63), issued from the southern ports of France bordering on the Bay of Biscay.  Duke William was at Valognes when he received information of this attack, and he immediately sent troops under the command of his squire, Sampson d’Anville, who landed at the harbour of St. Samson.  Being joined by the islanders who had sought refuge at the Castle of the Vale and other retreats, he defeated the invaders with much slaughter.  Duke William is also said to have made large concessions of land in Guernsey to d’Anville” (F.B.  Tupper, “History of Guernsey,” p. 41).

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