Castle Rackrent eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 136 pages of information about Castle Rackrent.

GLOSSARY 17.  DRIVER.

—­A man who is employed to drive tenants for rent; that is, to drive the cattle belonging to tenants to pound.  The office of driver is by no means a sinecure.

GLOSSARY 18.  I THOUGHT TO MAKE HIM A PRIEST.

—­It was customary amongst those of Thady’s rank in Ireland, whenever they could get a little money, to send their sons abroad to St. Omer’s, or to Spain, to be educated as priests.  Now they are educated at Maynooth.  The Editor has lately known a young lad, who began by being a post-boy, afterwards turn into a carpenter, then quit his plane and work-bench to study his humanities, as he said, at the college of Maynooth; but after he had gone through his course of Humanities, he determined to be a soldier instead of a priest.

GLOSSARY 19.  FLAM.

—­Short for flambeau.

GLOSSARY 20.  BARRACK-ROOM.

—­Formerly it was customary, in gentlemen’s houses in Ireland, to fit up one large bedchamber with a number of beds for the reception of occasional visitors.  These rooms were called Barrack-rooms.

GLOSSARY 21.  AN INNOCENT

—­in Ireland, means a simpleton, an idiot.

GLOSSARY 22.  THE CURRAGH

—­is the Newmarket of Ireland.

GLOSSARY 23.  THE CANT

—­The auction.

GLOSSARY 24.  AND SO SHOULD CUT HIM OFF FOR EVER BY LEVYING A FINE,

And suffering A recovery to dock the entail.—­The English reader may perhaps be surprised at the extent of Thady’s legal knowledge, and at the fluency with which he pours forth law-terms; but almost every poor man in Ireland, be he farmer, weaver, shopkeeper, ox steward, is, besides his other occupations, occasionally a lawyer.  The nature of processes, ejectments, custodiams, injunctions, replevins, etc., is perfectly known to them, and the terms as familiar to them as to any attorney.  They all love law.  It is a kind of lottery, in which every man, staking his own wit or cunning against his neighbour’s property, feels that he has little to lose, and much to gain.

‘I’ll have the law of you, so I will!’ is the saying of an Englishman who expects justice.  ‘I’ll have you before his honour,’ is the threat of an Irishman who hopes for partiality.  Miserable is the life of a justice of the peace in Ireland the day after a fair, especially if he resides near a small town.  The multitude of the kilt (kilt does not mean killed, but hurt) and wounded who come before his honour with black eyes

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Castle Rackrent from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.