Castle Rackrent eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 136 pages of information about Castle Rackrent.

GLOSSARY 3.  WHILLALUH.

—­Ullaloo, Gol, or lamentation over the dead—­

Magnoque ululante tumultu.—­Virgil.

     Ululatibus omne
     Implevere nemus.—­Ovid.

A full account of the Irish Gol, or Ullaloo, and of the Caoinan or Irish funeral song, with its first semichorus, second semichorus, full chorus of sighs and groans, together with the Irish words and music, may be found in the fourth volume of the transactions of the Royal Irish Academy.  For the advantage of lazy readers, who would rather read a page than walk a yard, and from compassion, not to say sympathy, with their infirmity, the Editor transcribes the following passages:—­

’The Irish have been always remarkable for their funeral lamentations; and this peculiarity has been noticed by almost every traveller who visited them; and it seems derived from their Celtic ancestors, the primaeval inhabitants of this isle. . . .

’It has been affirmed of the Irish, that to cry was more natural to them than to any other nation, and at length the Irish cry became proverbial. . . . .

’Cambrensis in the twelfth century says, the Irish then musically expressed their griefs; that is, they applied the musical art, in which they excelled all others, to the orderly celebration of funeral obsequies, by dividing the mourners into two bodies, each alternately singing their part, and the whole at times joining in full chorus. . . .  The body of the deceased, dressed in grave clothes, and ornamented with flowers, was placed on a bier, or some elevated spot.  The relations and keepers (singing mourners) ranged themselves in two divisions, one at the head, and the other at the feet of the corpse.  The bards and croteries had before prepared the funeral Caoinan.  The chief bard of the head chorus began by singing the first stanza, in a low, doleful tone, which was softly accompanied by the harp:  at the conclusion, the foot semichorus began the lamentation, or Ullaloo, from the final note of the preceding stanza, in which they were answered by the head semichorus; then both united in one general chorus.  The chorus of the first stanza being ended, the chief bard of the foot semichorus began the second Gol or lamentation, in which he was answered by that of the head; and then, as before, both united in the general full chorus.  Thus alternately were the song and choruses performed during the night.  The genealogy, rank, possessions, the virtues and vices of the dead were rehearsed, and a number of interrogations were addressed to the deceased; as, Why did he die?  If married, whether his wife was faithful to him, his sons dutiful, or good hunters or warriors?  If a woman, whether her daughters were fair or chaste?  If a young man, whether he had been crossed in love; or if the blue-eyed maids of Erin treated him with scorn?’

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Castle Rackrent from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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