I Saw Three Ships and Other Winter Tales eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 143 pages of information about I Saw Three Ships and Other Winter Tales.

    P.S.—­I reopen this to say that Squire Parkyn has accepted my offer
    for the chimney-piece.  Let me hear soon that you’ll come and look
    at it and give me your opinion.

THE TWO HOUSEHOLDERS.

Extract from the Memoirs of Gabriel Foot, Highwayman.

I will say this—­speaking as accurately as a man may, so long afterwards—­that when first I spied the house it put no desire in me but just to give thanks.

For conceive my case.  It was near mid-night, and ever since dusk I had been tramping the naked moors, in the teeth of as vicious a nor’-wester as ever drenched a man to the skin, and then blew the cold home to his marrow.  My clothes were sodden; my coat-tails flapped with a noise like pistol-shots; my boots squeaked as I went.  Overhead, the October moon was in her last quarter, and might have been a slice of finger-nail for all the light she afforded.  Two-thirds of the time the wrack blotted her out altogether; and I, with my stick clipped tight under my armpit, eyes puckered up, and head bent aslant, had to keep my wits alive to distinguish the road from the black heath to right and left.  For three hours I had met neither man nor man’s dwelling, and (for all I knew) was desperately lost.  Indeed, at the cross-roads, two miles back, there had been nothing for me but to choose the way that kept the wind on my face, and it gnawed me like a dog.

Mainly to allay the stinging of my eyes, I pulled up at last, turned right-about-face, leant back against the blast with a hand on my hat, and surveyed the blackness behind.  It was at this instant that, far away to the left, a point of light caught my notice, faint but steady; and at once I felt sure it burnt in the window of a house.  “The house,” thought I, “is a good mile off, beside the other road, and the light must have been an inch over my hat-brim for the last half-hour.”  This reflection—­that on so wide a moor I had come near missing the information I wanted (and perhaps a supper) by one inch—­sent a strong thrill down my back.

I cut straight across the heather towards the light, risking quags and pitfalls.  Nay, so heartening was the chance to hear a fellow creature’s voice, that I broke into a run, skipping over the stunted gorse that cropped up here and there, and dreading every moment to see the light quenched.  “Suppose it burns in an upper window, and the family is going to bed, as would be likely at this hour—­” The apprehension kept my eyes fixed on the bright spot, to the frequent scandal of my legs, that within five minutes were stuck full of gorse prickles.

But the light did not go out, and soon a flicker of moonlight gave me a glimpse of the house’s outline.  It proved to be a deal more imposing than I looked for—­the outline, in fact, of a tall, square barrack, with a cluster of chimneys at either end, like ears, and a high wall, topped by the roofs of some outbuildings, concealing the lower windows.  There was no gate in this wall, and presently I guessed the reason.  I was approaching the place from behind, and the light came from a back window on the first floor.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
I Saw Three Ships and Other Winter Tales from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook