The 30,000 Dollar Bequest and Other Stories eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 282 pages of information about The 30,000 Dollar Bequest and Other Stories.

Yes, we do so love our little distinctions!  And then we loftily scoff at a Prince for enjoying his larger ones; forgetting that if we only had his chance—­ah!  “Senator” is not a legitimate title.  A Senator has no more right to be addressed by it than have you or I; but, in the several state capitals and in Washington, there are five thousand Senators who take very kindly to that fiction, and who purr gratefully when you call them by it —­which you may do quite unrebuked.  Then those same Senators smile at the self-constructed majors and generals and judges of the South!

Indeed, we do love our distinctions, get them how we may.  And we work them for all they are worth.  In prayer we call ourselves “worms of the dust,” but it is only on a sort of tacit understanding that the remark shall not be taken at par.  We —­worms of the dust!  Oh, no, we are not that.  Except in fact; and we do not deal much in fact when we are contemplating ourselves.

As a race, we do certainly love a lord—­let him be Croker, or a duke, or a prize-fighter, or whatever other personage shall chance to be the head of our group.  Many years ago, I saw a greasy youth in overalls standing by the Herald office, with an expectant look in his face.  Soon a large man passed out, and gave him a pat on the shoulder.  That was what the boy was waiting for—­the large man’s notice.  The pat made him proud and happy, and the exultation inside of him shone out through his eyes; and his mates were there to see the pat and envy it and wish they could have that glory.  The boy belonged down cellar in the press-room, the large man was king of the upper floors, foreman of the composing-room.  The light in the boy’s face was worship, the foreman was his lord, head of his group.  The pat was an accolade.  It was as precious to the boy as it would have been if he had been an aristocrat’s son and the accolade had been delivered by his sovereign with a sword.  The quintessence of the honor was all there; there was no difference in values; in truth there was no difference present except an artificial one —­clothes.

All the human race loves a lord—­that is, loves to look upon or be noticed by the possessor of Power or Conspicuousness; and sometimes animals, born to better things and higher ideals, descend to man’s level in this matter.  In the Jardin des Plantes I have see a cat that was so vain of being the personal friend of an elephant that I was ashamed of her.

EXTRACTS FROM ADAM’S DIARY

Monday.—­This new creature with the long hair is a good deal in the way.  It is always hanging around and following me about.  I don’t like this; I am not used to company.  I wish it would stay with the other animals. . . .  Cloudy today, wind in the east; think we shall have rain. . . .  We?  Where did I get that word —­the new creature uses it.

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The 30,000 Dollar Bequest and Other Stories from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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