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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 282 pages of information about The 30,000 Dollar Bequest and Other Stories.

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Yes, I think it is very sweet—­and very solemn and impressive, if you get the andantino and the pianissimo right.

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Oh, gum-drops, gum-drops!  But I never allow them to eat striped candy. 
And of course they can’t, till they get their teeth, anyway.

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What?

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Oh, not in the least—­go right on.  He’s here writing—­it doesn’t bother him.

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Very well, I’ll come if I can. (Aside.) Dear me, how it does tire a person’s arm to hold this thing up so long!  I wish she’d—­

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Oh no, not at all; I like to talk—­but I’m afraid I’m keeping you from your affairs.

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Visitors?

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No, we never use butter on them.

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Yes, that is a very good way; but all the cook-books say they are very unhealthy when they are out of season.  And he doesn’t like them, anyway—­especially canned.

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Oh, I think that is too high for them; we have never paid over fifty cents a bunch.

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Must you go?  Well, good-by.

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Yes, I think so.  Good-by.

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Four o’clock, then—­I’ll be ready.  Good-by.

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Thank you ever so much.  Good-by.

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Oh, not at all!—­just as fresh—­which?  Oh, I’m glad to hear you say that.  Good-by.

(Hangs up the telephone and says, “Oh, it does tire a person’s arm so!”)

A man delivers a single brutal “Good-by,” and that is the end of it.  Not so with the gentle sex—­I say it in their praise; they cannot abide abruptness.

EDWARD MILLS AND GEORGE BENTON:  A TALE

These two were distantly related to each other—­seventh cousins, or something of that sort.  While still babies they became orphans, and were adopted by the Brants, a childless couple, who quickly grew very fond of them.  The Brants were always saying:  “Be pure, honest, sober, industrious, and considerate of others, and success in life is assured.”  The children heard this repeated some thousands of times before they understood it; they could repeat it themselves long before they could say the Lord’s Prayer; it was painted over the nursery door, and was about the first thing they learned to read.  It was destined to be the unswerving rule of Edward Mills’s life.  Sometimes the Brants changed the wording a little, and said:  “Be pure, honest, sober, industrious, considerate, and you will never lack friends.”

Baby Mills was a comfort to everybody about him.  When he wanted candy and could not have it, he listened to reason, and contented himself without it.  When Baby Benton wanted candy, he cried for it until he got it.  Baby Mills took care of his toys; Baby Benton always destroyed his in a very brief time, and then made himself so insistently disagreeable that, in order to have peace in the house, little Edward was persuaded to yield up his play-things to him.

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