Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 301 pages of information about David Balfour, Second Part.

PART I

THE LORD ADVOCATE

* * * * *

CHAPTER I

A BEGGAR ON HORSEBACK

The 25th day of August, 1751, about two in the afternoon, I, David Balfour, came forth of the British Linen Company, a porter attending me with a bag of money, and some of the chief of these merchants bowing me from their doors.  Two days before, and even so late as yestermorning, I was like a beggarman by the wayside, clad in rags, brought down to my last shillings, my companion a condemned traitor, a price set on my own head for a crime with the news of which the country rang.  To-day I was served heir to my position in life, a landed laird, a bank porter by me carrying my gold, recommendations in my pocket, and (in the words of the saying) the ball directly at my foot.

There were two circumstances that served me as ballast to so much sail.  The first was the very difficult and deadly business I had still to handle; the second, the place that I was in.  The tall, black city, and the numbers and movement and noise of so many folk, made a new world for me, after the moorland braes, the sea-sands, and the still country-sides that I had frequented up to then.  The throng of the citizens in particular abashed me.  Rankeillor’s son was short and small in the girth; his clothes scarce held on me; and it was plain I was ill qualified to strut in the front of a bank-porter.  It was plain, if I did so, I should but set folk laughing, and (what was worse in my case) set them asking questions.  So that I behooved to come by some clothes of my own, and in the meanwhile to walk by the porter’s side, and put my hand on his arm as though we were a pair of friends.

At a merchant’s in the Luckenbooths, I had myself fitted out:  none too fine, for I had no idea to appear like a beggar on horseback; but comely and responsible, so that servants should respect me.  Thence to an armourer’s, where I got a plain sword, to suit with my degree in life.  I felt safer with the weapon, though (for one so ignorant of defence) it might be called an added danger.  The porter, who was naturally a man of some experience, judged my accoutrement to be well chosen.

“Naething kenspeckle,"[1] said he, “plain, dacent claes.  As for the rapier, nae doubt it sits wi’ your degree; but an I had been you, I would hae waired my siller better-gates than that.”  And proposed I should buy winter-hosen from a wife in the Cowgate-back, that was a cousin of his own, and made them “extraordinar endurable.”

Follow Us on Facebook