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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 106 pages of information about The Bay State Monthly Volume 2, No. 5, February, 1885.

Here, too, was concocted the fiendish plot of Dr. Blackburn, a Kentuckian, for introducing yellow fever into northern cities, by sending thither boxes of infected clothing.

[The foregoing article on the history of Bermuda was compiled by the author of “Stark’s Illustrated Bermuda Guide,” published by the Photo-Electrotype Company, of 63 Oliver Street, Boston.  The work contains about two hundred pages and is embellished with sixteen photo-prints, numerous engravings, and a new map of Bermuda made from the latest surveys.—­ED.]

* * * * *

HEART AND I.

BY MARY HELEN BOODEY.

  Singing, singing through the valleys;
    Singing, singing up the hills;
  Peace that comes, and Love that tarries,
    Hope that cheers, and Faith that thrills,
  Heart and I, are we not blest
  At the thought of coming rest?

  Singing, singing ’neath the shadow;
    Singing, singing in the light;
  Plucking flowerets from the meadow,
    Seeing beauty up the height,
  Heart and I, are we not gay
  Thinking of unclouded day?

  Singing, singing through the summer;
    Singing, singing in the snow;
  Glad to hear the brooklets murmur,
    Patient when the wild winds blow,
  Heart and I, can we do this? 
  Yes, because of future bliss.

  Singing, singing up to Heaven;
    Singing, singing down to earth;
  Unto all some good is given. 
    Unto all there cometh worth;
  Heart and I, we sing to know
  That the good God loves us so.

* * * * *

ELIZABETH.

A ROMANCE OF COLONIAL DAYS.

BY FRANCES C. SPARHAWK, Author of “A Lazy Man’s Work.”

CHAPTER VIII.

DEPARTURE.

With suppressed ejaculations and outspoken condolences the party broke up.  It was not until the last one had gone that Mrs. Eveleigh, leaving her post of observation in the corner, swept out to find Elizabeth who disappeared after Stephen Archdale had gone with Katie.  She found her in her bed-room trying to put her things into her box.  Her face was flushed, and her hands cold and trembling.

“Why have you waited so long?” she began.  “We must go at once.  Have you sent for a carriage?  We shall meet ours on the way.”

“My dear,” answered the other seating herself, “that is impossible.  They will not turn you out, if you have made a mistake.  You can not go until to-morrow, of course; nobody will expect it.  I am very sorry for poor Archdale and the young lady, but I dare say it will turn out all right.”

Elizabeth raised herself from the box over which she had been stooping throwing in her things in an agony of haste.  She opened her lips, but words failed her.  The amazement and indignation of her look turned slowly to an appealing glance that few could have resisted.  She had been used to Mrs. Eveleigh’s not comprehending nice distinctions, but now it seemed as if to be a woman would make one understand.  If her father were with her now!  She turned away sharply.

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