A Kindergarten Story Book eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 66 pages of information about A Kindergarten Story Book.

“You have been very kind, my little friend,” said the fox.  “You have saved my life.  If you have a wish, tell me what it is and it shall be granted.”

“Oh, as to that,” said Ludwig, “I wish my little pail here were full of berries, for my sister and I are very hungry.”  Hardly had he spoken when his pail, which before had been quite empty, became full to the very brim with great delicious strawberries.  Ludwig ran swiftly home to the little brown hut where he and his sister lived quite alone on the edge of the forest.

“See, sister dear,” he called, “what a fine breakfast I have brought.”

“I am glad, brother,” said Marleen, “for I am very hungry; but where did you find so many berries in so short a time, and such delicious ones, too?”

Then Ludwig told his sister all about the fox, and how he had wished for the berries.

“Was I not wise, dear sister, to get such a good breakfast for us with so little trouble?”

But Marleen was not satisfied, and cried: 

“Foolish boy!  It was no ordinary fox whose foot you pulled out of the trap.  If he could fill your pail with berries, just for the asking, he could do far greater things.  You should have wished for something better.  Go back into the forest, find the fox, and tell him that our cupboard must be always full of food whenever we are hungry.”

“Be satisfied, dear sister,” said Ludwig.  “We are quite happy as we are.  When we are again hungry I will go and find food in the forest as I have always done before.”

“No, no, I will not be satisfied!” said Marleen.  “You must do as I tell you;” and she gave her brother no peace until he went again into the forest.

“How now, little brother!” said the fox, when he saw Ludwig coming toward him through the trees; “is it not well with you?”

“Alas, my sister is not satisfied with the pail of berries,” said Ludwig.

“What would she, little brother?”

“That our cupboard should be always full whenever we are hungry.”

“Go, little brother, it shall be as she wishes,” said the fox.

Now, after this, whenever brother or sister were hungry, they found plenty of food just to their liking in the cupboard; and, as Ludwig had no longer to seek for nuts and berries in the forest, he could play all day long with his sister, and they were very happy because they were never separated.  But after a time Marleen refused to play, and sat moping on the doorstone.  “Why are you so troubled, sister?  Come, let us play in the sunshine,” said the boy.

“Why should I be happy?” said Marleen.  “Why should I play?  We have no toys, only ugly sticks and stones for playthings.  If you will go to the fox and get a beautiful doll, then I will play.”

“Be satisfied, dear sister,” said Ludwig.  “We are quite happy as we are.”

“No, no, I will not be satisfied!” said Marleen.  “You must do as I tell you;” and she gave her brother no peace until he went again into the forest.

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A Kindergarten Story Book from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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